economist.com Archives - 29 April 2017, Saturday

  • Expert witnesses argued that his treatment was the modus operandi for the Singapore regime

    A haven for the crass: An outspoken Singaporean blogger wins asylum in America

    economist.com 01 Apr '17, 7am

    In a huffy response, Singapore’s government noted America “allows…hate speech under the rubric of freedom of speech”, whereas Singapore does not. “It is the prerogative of the US to take in such people,” it conceded, as if Mr Yee had received asylum because of the content of his speec...

  • Singapore retains its title as the world’s most expensive city for a fourth consecutive year https://t.co/RLIHk6YVKM

    Daily chart: Measuring the cost of living worldwide

    economist.com 21 Mar '17, 10pm

    SINGAPORE retains its title as the world’s most expensive city for a fourth consecutive year, according to the latest cost-of-living survey from the Economist Intelligence Unit, our sister company. The survey, which compares the prices of 160 goods and services in 133 cities around th...

  • The government of Singapore says it welcomes criticism, but its critics still suffer

    Speak out and be damned: The government of Singapore says it welcomes criticism, but its critics still suffer

    economist.com 13 Mar '17, 7am

    LIKE most constitutions, Singapore’s promises freedom of speech. Unlike most, it allows the government to limit that freedom with “such restrictions as it considers necessary or expedient” to maintain national security, friendly relations with other countries or public order and moral...

  • Buttonwood: The subdued mood in Singapore’s financial industry |

    economist.com 12 Mar '17, 7pm

    But Singapore faces a strong challenge as a regional finance hub from Hong Kong, which benefits from far stronger links to the Chinese economy. Hong Kong has the upper hand over Singapore in terms of investment banking, particularly in corporate-finance businesses such as mergers and ...

  • Buttonwood: The subdued mood in Singapore’s financial industry |

    economist.com 12 Mar '17, 3am

    But Singapore faces a strong challenge as a regional finance hub from Hong Kong, which benefits from far stronger links to the Chinese economy. Hong Kong has the upper hand over Singapore in terms of investment banking, particularly in corporate-finance businesses such as mergers and ...

  • Speak out and be damned: The government of Singapore says it welcomes criticism, but its critics still suffer

    economist.com 11 Mar '17, 1am

    LIKE most constitutions, Singapore’s promises freedom of speech. Unlike most, it allows the government to limit that freedom with “such restrictions as it considers necessary or expedient” to maintain national security, friendly relations with other countries or public order and moral...

  • Buttonwood: The subdued mood in Singapore’s financial industry |

    economist.com 10 Mar '17, 1pm

    But Singapore faces a strong challenge as a regional finance hub from Hong Kong, which benefits from far stronger links to the Chinese economy. Hong Kong has the upper hand over Singapore in terms of investment banking, particularly in corporate-finance businesses such as mergers and ...

  • Speak out and be damned: The government of Singapore says it welcomes criticism, but its critics still suffer

    economist.com 09 Mar '17, 10pm

    LIKE most constitutions, Singapore’s promises freedom of speech. Unlike most, it allows the government to limit that freedom with “such restrictions as it considers necessary or expedient” to maintain national security, friendly relations with other countries or public order and moral...

  • Buttonwood: The subdued mood in Singapore’s financial industry |

    economist.com 09 Mar '17, 6pm

    SINGAPORE owes its existence, and its prosperity, to its place at the heart of intra-Asian trade. In more than 50 years of independence, the city-state has striven mightily to attract investment from all over the world. Such has been its success, indeed, that others hope to imitate it...

  • The great chain of being sure about things #blockchain #fintech #DLT #theeconomist #technology

    great chain of being sure about things

    economist.com 28 Jan '17, 2pm

    Is there a way round this? Imagine that Alice changes her mind about paying Bob and tries to rewrite history so that her bitcoin stays in her wallet. If she were a competent miner she could solve the requisite puzzle and produce a new version of the blockchain. But in the time it took...

  • Financial centres such as Hong Kong and Singapore are aggressively trying to attract lessors away from Dublin

    Emerald aisles: Brexit poses a threat to Ireland’s aircraft-leasing business |

    economist.com 27 Jan '17, 9am

    THE glass office blocks of Dublin’s docklands still stand proud; the banks that built them no longer do. The financial crisis of 2008 took down Ireland’s six biggest lenders. Within five years Dublin slid from being rated by Z/Yen, a London-based business think-tank, as the world’s te...

  • elephant in the truck: Retraining low-skilled workers

    economist.com 14 Jan '17, 5pm

    IMAGINE YOU ARE a 45-year-old long-distance lorry driver. You never enjoyed school and left as soon as you could, with a smattering of qualifications and no great love of learning. The job is tiring and solitary, but it does at least seem to offer decent job security: driver shortages...

  • elephant in the truck: Retraining low-skilled workers

    economist.com 14 Jan '17, 4pm

    IMAGINE YOU ARE a 45-year-old long-distance lorry driver. You never enjoyed school and left as soon as you could, with a smattering of qualifications and no great love of learning. The job is tiring and solitary, but it does at least seem to offer decent job security: driver shortages...

  • Asia is still just saying no to drugs

    economist.com 14 Jan '17, 11am

    “FOR the first few days,” explains Aki, a young man who helps run a drug rehabilitation centre on the outskirts of Myitkyina, the capital of Kachin State, in northern Myanmar, “some of them try to run away. So we have to keep them like this.” A young man, naked except for a tattered p...

  • Asia is still just saying no to drugs

    economist.com 13 Jan '17, 7am

    “FOR the first few days,” explains Aki, a young man who helps run a drug rehabilitation centre on the outskirts of Myitkyina, the capital of Kachin State, in northern Myanmar, “some of them try to run away. So we have to keep them like this.” A young man, naked except for a tattered p...

  • Out of the box: Singapore tries to become a fintech hub

    economist.com 12 Jan '17, 6pm

    IN AN era when architectural masterpieces curve and bloom (Zaha Hadid), or shimmy and fold (Frank Gehry), designers of central-bank buildings remain reassuringly fond of right angles. The Monetary Authority of Singapore (MAS), the city-state’s central bank and financial regulator, is ...

  • Out of the box: Singapore tries to become a fintech hub

    economist.com 12 Jan '17, 6pm

    IN AN era when architectural masterpieces curve and bloom (Zaha Hadid), or shimmy and fold (Frank Gehry), designers of central-bank buildings remain reassuringly fond of right angles. The Monetary Authority of Singapore (MAS), the city-state’s central bank and financial regulator, is ...

  • Asia is still just saying no to drugs

    economist.com 12 Jan '17, 5pm

    “FOR the first few days,” explains Aki, a young man who helps run a drug rehabilitation centre on the outskirts of Myitkyina, the capital of Kachin State, in northern Myanmar, “some of them try to run away. So we have to keep them like this.” A young man, naked except for a tattered p...

  • Singapore tries to become a fintech hub

    economist.com 12 Jan '17, 4pm

    IN AN era when architectural masterpieces curve and bloom (Zaha Hadid), or shimmy and fold (Frank Gehry), designers of central-bank buildings remain reassuringly fond of right angles. The Monetary Authority of Singapore (MAS), the city-state’s central bank and financial regulator, is ...

  • Singapore tries to become a fintech hub

    economist.com 12 Jan '17, 4pm

    IN AN era when architectural masterpieces curve and bloom (Zaha Hadid), or shimmy and fold (Frank Gehry), designers of central-bank buildings remain reassuringly fond of right angles. The Monetary Authority of Singapore (MAS), the city-state’s central bank and financial regulator, is ...

  • Singapore expands its paternalistic policy on race

    economist.com 17 Dec '16, 10am

    The old way of ensuring racial harmony ON A side street in the centre of Singapore, a Muslim-American lawyer beats his wife bloody, only to be treated to rapturous applause. The lawyer is Amir Kapoor, the central character in Ayad Akhtar’s play “Disgraced”, which recently completed a ...

  • Singapore expands its paternalistic policy on race

    economist.com 16 Dec '16, 11am

    The old way of ensuring racial harmony ON A side street in the centre of Singapore, a Muslim-American lawyer beats his wife bloody, only to be treated to rapturous applause. The lawyer is Amir Kapoor, the central character in Ayad Akhtar’s play “Disgraced”, which recently completed a ...

  • Singapore expands its paternalistic policy on race

    economist.com 09 Dec '16, 5pm

    ON A side street in the centre of Singapore, a Muslim-American lawyer beats his wife bloody, only to be treated to rapturous applause. The lawyer is Amir Kapoor, the central character in Ayad Akhtar’s play “Disgraced”, which completes a run this week at the Singapore Repertory Theatre...

  • Singapore expands its paternalistic policy on race

    economist.com 09 Dec '16, 1pm

    ON A side street in the centre of Singapore, a Muslim-American lawyer beats his wife bloody, only to be treated to rapturous applause. The lawyer is Amir Kapoor, the central character in Ayad Akhtar’s play “Disgraced”, which completes a run this week at the Singapore Repertory Theatre...

  • There are idiosyncratic reasons for Canada, Finland, Japan and Singapore's success in the PISA

    Learning from the world’s swottiest countries |

    economist.com 01 Dec '16, 9pm

    Cleverlands: The Secrets Behind the Success of the World’s Education Superpowers. By Lucy Crehan. Unbound; 304 pages; £16.99. FROM 2000 to 2002, about a third of a million 15-year-olds from 43 countries took similar tests in maths, reading and science. The results of the first Program...

  • The bond market looks about as intimidating as a chihuahua in a handbag

    Who’s scary now? |

    economist.com 26 Oct '16, 11am

    JAMES CARVILLE, political adviser to Bill Clinton, the former president, famously said that he wanted to be reincarnated as the bond market so he could “intimidate everybody”. He was frustrated by the administration’s inability to push through an economic stimulus for fear of spooking...

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    economist.com 03 Oct '16, 5pm

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    economist.com 16 Sep '16, 5am

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