hackaday.com Archives - 08 July 2015, Wednesday

  • Bread Online is a Bread Maker for the Internet of Things

    Bread Online is a Bread Maker for the Internet of Things | Hackaday

    hackaday.com 08 Jul '15, 2am

    An engineering student at the University of Western Macedonia has just added another appliance to the ever-growing list of Internet enabled things. [Panagiotis] decided to modify an off-the-shelf bread maker to enable remote control via the Internet . [Panagiotis] had to remove pretty...

  • Headphone Amp Features A Tiny CRT | Hackaday

    hackaday.com 07 Jul '15, 11pm

    [ErikaFluff] needed an amp for his Grado open cans. Rather than build yet another boring black box, he built what may be the most awesome headphone amp ever. [ErikaFluff] added a tiny CRT to the project , which displays the current audio waveform passing through the amp. He packaged a...

  • Hackaday’s Interview with [Massimo Banzi]

    Hackaday’s Interview with Arduino CEO [Massimo Banzi] | Hackaday

    hackaday.com 07 Jul '15, 8pm

    I caught up with [Massimo Banzi] at the Shenzhen Maker Faire to talk about manufacturing in China, the current and future of Arduino, and how recent events may shape the Open Hardware landscape. The big news from Arduino at SZMF is a new partnership with Seeed Studio to manufacture th...

  • Micro:bit — BBC Gets A Million Kids Into Embedded Dev | Hackaday

    hackaday.com 07 Jul '15, 5pm

    In the Early 1980s, the BBC launched a project to teach computer literacy to a generation of British schoolchildren. This project resulted in the BBC Micro, a very capable home computer that showed a generation exactly what a computer could do. These children then went home, turned on...

  • 50 Winners Using Microchip Parts | Hackaday

    hackaday.com 07 Jul '15, 4pm

    For the last few weeks we’ve been celebrating builds that use parts from our manufacturer sponsors of the 2015 Hackaday Prize. Today we are happy to announce 50 winners who used Microchip parts in their builds . Making the cut is one thing, but rising to the top is another. These buil...

  • Upgrading An Old Lantern

    Upgrading An Old Lantern | Hackaday

    hackaday.com 07 Jul '15, 2pm

    [Shockwaver] stumbled across some old kerosene lanterns, and decided he also stumbled across his next project. He decided to leave the kerosene out, and in its place used some RGB LEDs to bring the lanterns back to life . This is quite an upgrade. Considering the burning kerosene will...

  • Writing Doom For The Raspberry Pi

    Writing Doom For The Raspberry Pi | Hackaday

    hackaday.com 07 Jul '15, 1pm

    We’ve all seen Doom played on the Raspberry Pi before… but this isn’t a port of the game. No, this was a school project at the Imperial College of London — writing the game in bare assembly. They wrote it from scratch. Complete with a custom home made controller connected directly to ...

  • Restoring An Espresso Machine To The 21st Century

    Restoring An Espresso Machine To The 21st Century | Hackaday

    hackaday.com 06 Jul '15, 8pm

    [Rhys Goodwin] has a wonderful Italian espresso machine, a Brasilia ‘Lady’. But the electronics in it are a bit outdated. So he decided to give the entire thing an overhaul , while keeping it as original as possible! As far as espresso machines go, this model is pretty simple. It uses...

  • Stenography (Yes, with Arduinos)

    Stenography (Yes, with Arduinos) | Hackaday

    hackaday.com 06 Jul '15, 5pm

    What’s the fastest keyboard? Few subjects are as divisive in the geek community. Clicky or squishy? QWERTY or Dvorak? Old-school IBM or Microsoft Natural? The answer: none of the above. The fastest normal-keyboard typists (Dvorak or Qwerty) can get around 220 words per minute (wpm) in...

  • 50 Winners Using Texas Instruments Parts | Hackaday

    hackaday.com 06 Jul '15, 4pm

    For the last few weeks we’ve been celebrating builds that use parts from our manufacturer sponsors of the 2015 Hackaday Prize. Today we are happy to announce 50 winners who used Texas Instruments parts in their builds . Making the cut is one thing, but rising to the top is another. Th...

  • A Perfect San Francisco for Hackaday Prize Worldwide

    A Perfect San Francisco for Hackaday Prize Worldwide | Hackaday

    hackaday.com 06 Jul '15, 2pm

    We opened the Workshop at 9:30am and those lucky enough to get a free ticket before the event was full streamed in. The topic at hand was a transfer of knowledge on professional level PCB design and once again [Matt Berggren] didn’t disappoint. A former Altium veteran, experienced har...

  • Laser Engraving in Color?

    Laser Engraving in Color? | Hackaday

    hackaday.com 06 Jul '15, 11am

    Here’s a fantastic way to add a new dynamic to your laser cut and engraved parts. Did you know it is possible to color your engravings on acrylic? It’s kind of one of those moments where you go “Why didn’t I think of that?” [Frankie Flood] works at the Digital Craft Research Lab (DCRL...

  • World’s Greatest Bubble Machine born of Space Program

    World’s Greatest Bubble Machine born of Space Program | Hackaday

    hackaday.com 06 Jul '15, 8am

    [GordonKirkwood] needs soap bubbles. Big soap bubbles. Why does he need soap bubbles? Because – soap bubbles! Actually, [Gordon] is a photographer, and he wants to capture candid moments and fleeting expressions. What better way to inspire wonder and amazement than to be able to produ...

  • Hackaday Prize Entry: DIY Eye Tracking | Hackaday

    hackaday.com 06 Jul '15, 5am

    Deep in the dark recesses of Internet advertisers and production studios, there’s a very, very strange device. It fits on a user’s head, has a camera pointing out, but also a camera pointing back at the user. That extra camera is aimed right at the eye. This is a gaze tracking system,...

  • USA vs Japan: Giant Robot Battle | Hackaday

    hackaday.com 06 Jul '15, 2am

    It’s basically an advert for a Autodesk, but the video is so ridiculous, we can’t resist: The MegaBots team challenges Suidobashi Heavy Industries to a robot battle. Artisan’s Asylum, a hackerspace in Boston, tried and failed to raise $1.8 million in a kickstarter , but then they got ...

  • Hackaday Links: July 5, 2015 | Hackaday

    hackaday.com 05 Jul '15, 11pm

    It’s the fifth of July. What should that mean? Videos on YouTube of quadcopters flying into fireworks displays. Surprisingly, there are none. If you find one, put it up in the comments. The original PlayStation was a Nintendo/Sony collaboration. This week, some random dude found a pro...

  • The Nicest Home Made Spot Welder We’ve Ever Seen

    The Nicest Home Made Spot Welder We’ve Ever Seen | Hackaday

    hackaday.com 05 Jul '15, 8pm

    By golly, look at the build quality of this homemade spot welder. Just about everyone on here knows it’s quite possible to build one of these things using a re-wrapped microwave transformer , but they’re usually made of wood like the one we swap on Friday , and we often wonder how muc...

  • Maker Faire Kansas City: That’s A Wrap

    Maker Faire Kansas City: That’s A Wrap | Hackaday

    hackaday.com 05 Jul '15, 5pm

    The 5th annual Kansas City Maker Faire was as fun as ever, but it definitely felt different from previous years. There seemed to be an unofficial emphasis on crafts this year, and I mean this in the broadest sense of the word. There was more exposure for the event in the local media, ...

  • State-Aware Foldable Electronics Enters The Third Dimension

    State-Aware Foldable Electronics Enters The Third Dimension | Hackaday

    hackaday.com 05 Jul '15, 2pm

    Still working with PCBs in 2D? Not [Yoav]. With some clever twists on the way we fab PCBs, he’s managed to create a state-aware foldable circuit board that responds to different configurations. From his paper [PDF warning], [Yoav] discusses two techniques for developing foldable circu...

  • Wood & Glue RepStrap Works Surprisingly Well

    Wood & Glue RepStrap Works Surprisingly Well | Hackaday

    hackaday.com 05 Jul '15, 11am

    Even with the cost of 3D Printers continually falling, entering the hobby still requires a significant investment. [Skeat] had some typical 3D Printer components available but didn’t have access to a printer for making the ever-so-common frame parts of typical RepRap designs. [Skeat’s...

  • Pico Space Balloon Circumnavigates the Globe, Twice

    Pico Space Balloon Circumnavigates the Globe, Twice | Hackaday

    hackaday.com 05 Jul '15, 8am

    We’ve reported on “space” balloons before. Heck, some of us have even launched a few. Usually they go way up in the air, take some cool pictures, and land within driving (and retrieving) distance the same afternoon. You get often amazing photos and bragging rights that you took them f...

  • Hackaday Prize Entry: Controlling Relays Over WiFi | Hackaday

    hackaday.com 05 Jul '15, 5am

    It’s been less than a year since the ESP8266 WiFi Module was released. This is a chip whose original data sheets were only available in Chinese, could only be controlled through AT commands, and was (originally) only sold through Seeed Studio and other various Chinese retailers. It ha...

  • High Voltage, Wood and Resin Result in Fractal Art | Hackaday

    hackaday.com 05 Jul '15, 2am

    Wood burning, which goes by pyrography when it’s feeling fancy, has been an art form for centuries. [PapaJ06] puts a new twist on it by using a microwave oven transformer to generate fractal patterns in wood . We’ve seen these Lichtenberg figures before, but generally as electric disc...

  • Exploding Multimeter Battle Royale

    Exploding Multimeter Battle Royale | Hackaday

    hackaday.com 04 Jul '15, 11pm

    If you check out eBay, Amazon, or the other kinda-shady online retailers out there, you’ll quickly find you can buy a CAT III (600V) rated multimeter for under $50. If you think about it, this is incredible. There’s a lot of engineering that needs to go into a meter that is able to me...

  • Ducted Fan Drone Flies

    Ducted Fan Drone Flies | Hackaday

    hackaday.com 04 Jul '15, 8pm

    A while back, we wrote about the ducted fan, single rotor, VTOL drone that [Armin Strobel] was working on. It wasn’t quite finished then, and hadn’t got off the ground yet. He’s posted an update, and from the looks of it, he’s made tons of progress, including a first flight with succe...

  • Joining Sheet Metal Together with a DIY Spot Welder

    Joining Sheet Metal Together with a DIY Spot Welder | Hackaday

    hackaday.com 04 Jul '15, 5pm

    Once in a while there comes a time that you need a tool for one specific job. In these cases, it doesn’t make much sense to buy an expensive tool to use just once or twice. For most of us, Spot Welders would fall into this category. [mrjohngoh] had the need to join two pieces of sheet...

  • Caption CERN Contest – Cut the Black Wire

    Caption CERN Contest – Cut the Black Wire | Hackaday

    hackaday.com 04 Jul '15, 2pm

    Week 21 of the Caption CERN Contest is now history. It’s been a great week of captions, so as always a huge thank you goes out to everyone who entered. We still have no idea what these two CERN scientists were working on. Lenses, switches, and a giant glass screen which could have any...

  • Using a Voltage Regulator as a Constant Current Source

    Using a Voltage Regulator as a Constant Current Source | Hackaday

    hackaday.com 04 Jul '15, 11am

    [Afroman] contacted us to share his new video on the LM317 . The humble LM317 adjustable voltage regulator is everywhere. From wifi routers, to high spec lab equipment. Given a noisy input and a variable load, a voltage regulator will give a nice clean, stable output voltage. We’ve co...

  • Rotary Indexer gives Mill a 4th axis (sort of)

    Rotary Indexer gives Mill a 4th axis (sort of) | Hackaday

    hackaday.com 04 Jul '15, 8am

    Rotary indexer’s are standard issue in most machine shops. These allow you to hold or chuck a work piece, and then a graduated handle lets you to rotate the workpiece. Useful when you want to drill or tap axial or radial features. A rack and pinion drive ensures that the workpiece doe...

  • Hackaday Prize Entry: They Make FPGAs That Small?

    Hackaday Prize Entry: They Make FPGAs That Small? | Hackaday

    hackaday.com 04 Jul '15, 5am

    There are a few development boards entered in this year’s Hackaday Prize, and most of them cover well-tread ground with their own unique spin. There are not many FPGA dev boards entered. Whether this is because programmable logic is somehow still a dark art for solder jockeys or becau...