hackaday.com Archives - 24 April 2014, Thursday

  • Digispark Pro, The Bigger Smaller Dev Board

    hackaday.com 24 Apr '14, 2am

    There has recently been a huge influx of extremely small dev board based on the ATtiny85. This small 8-pin microcontroller is able to run most Arduino sketches, and the small size and low price of these dev boards means they have been extremely popular. The Digispark was among the fir...

  • Black Mirror, Black Hole: Kill Your Television

    Black Mirror, Black Hole: Kill Your Television

    hackaday.com 23 Apr '14, 11pm

    If you want to do something similar for your web browsing, here is how to do a simple local redirect on windows: 1. Little known fact, IIS, microsoft’s website hosting software comes with windows 7. Install it via the ‘features’ part of programs and features in the control panel. 2. M...

  • Micro-Robots Are Scary Awesome

    hackaday.com 23 Apr '14, 8pm

    A team of scientists at SRI international are creating real-life replicators from Star Gate SG1 — micro-robots capable of smart (and scary!) manufacturing. Thousands working in parallel will be able to achieve tasks previously unheard of, in a completely compact and integrated system....

  • New post: Video: Getting Your Feet Wet with Programmable System On Chip

    Hackaday Programmable System on Chip Introduction by Bil Herd

    hackaday.com 23 Apr '14, 5pm

    PSOC 4 Pioneer kit from Cypress I have wanted to play with this little mixed-signal Programmable System-on-Chip (PSOC) developer board. I love developer boards, providing that they are priced in a way to entice me to not only open my wallet but also make time in a busy schedule. I thi...

  • TherMOFOrmer

    hackaday.com 23 Apr '14, 2pm

    3D printers are the tool of choice for all the hackerspaces we’ve been to, and laser cutters take a close second. There’s another class of plastic manipulating machines that doesn’t get enough credit with the hackerspace crowd – the vacuum thermoformer. Surprisingly, there haven’t bee...

  • Sci-Fi Contest Roundup: Science Nonfiction

    Sci-Fi Contest Roundup: Science Nonfiction

    hackaday.com 23 Apr '14, 11am

    Yep, we have a Sci-Fi contest on our hands, with a week to go until entries are due. There are amazing prizes for the best Sci-Fi build, but in the spirit of the Internet, a few teams have elected to put together a science nonfiction project. We won’t hold that against them, because t...

  • Need An Idea For Your Next Kickstarter? Check Out This Kickstarter!

    Need An Idea For Your Next Kickstarter? Check Out This Kickstarter!

    hackaday.com 23 Apr '14, 9am

    Kickstarter has become the most powerful force in kickstarting new hardware projects, video games, documentaries, and board games, and now everyone wants a piece of the action. The problem obviously isn’t product development and engineering; you can just conjure that up with a little ...

  • I2S Audio And SPI Display With An Ethernet Module

    I2S Audio And SPI Display With An Ethernet Module

    hackaday.com 23 Apr '14, 8am

    [kgsws] is working on a small project that requires some audio and a display of some sort. While this project can be easily completed with a bigish microcontroller or ARM board, he’s taking a much simpler route: the entire project is built around a cheap router module , giving this pr...

  • Electromagnetic Spiderman Webshooter Railgun / Grappling Hook

    hackaday.com 23 Apr '14, 5am

    Electromagnetic Spiderman Webshooter Railgun / Grappling Hook April 22, 2014 By James Hobson 3 Comments As technology continues to advance, make-believe props and technology from movies are coming closer and closer to reality. [Patrick Priebe] has managed to put together a working Spi...

  • HummingBoard, The Vastly More Powerful Raspi

    HummingBoard, The Vastly More Powerful Raspi

    hackaday.com 23 Apr '14, 3am

    http://www.cnx-software.com/2014/04/21/solidrun-hummingboard-is-a-raspberry-pi-compatible-board-powered-by-freescale-i-mx6/#comment-182046 : “First-generation CuBox that used an ARM SoC from Marvell had very poor support from SolidRun as a company and instead practically only relied o...

  • Sci-Fi Contest Roundup: Doctor Who

    Sci-Fi Contest Roundup: Doctor Who

    hackaday.com 22 Apr '14, 11pm

    What’s a Sci-Fi contest without entries from the longest running sci-fi TV show, Doctor Who ? Sonic Screwdriver Door Lock Ah yes, the iconic Sonic Screwdriver, able to get the Doctor out of almost any jam — with style. Started this project over a year ago, [Daniel] figured a Sci-Fi co...

  • Retrotectacular: The Science of Derailing Trains

    Retrotectacular: The Science of Derailing Trains

    hackaday.com 22 Apr '14, 5pm

    The test setup itself is neat. An old derelict locomotive is used. It, as well as a number of trailing cars, is pushed by a functioning engine from behind. Once up to about 26 MPH the pusher stops and the rest keep going. There are many tests, starting with just a few inches of track ...

  • [Balint]‘s GNU Radio Tutorials

    hackaday.com 22 Apr '14, 2pm

    [Balint] has a bit of history in dealing with software defined radios and cheap USB TV tuners turned into what would have been very expensive hardware a few years ago. Now [Balint] is finally posting a few really great GNU Radio tutorials , aimed at getting software defined radio begi...

  • Self-Learning Helicopter Uses Neural Network

    Self-Learning Helicopter Uses Neural Network

    hackaday.com 22 Apr '14, 11am

    Though this project uses an RC helicopter, it’s merely a vessel to demonstrate a fascinating machine learning algorithm developed by two Cornell students – [Akshay] and [Sergio]. The learning environment is set up with the helicopter at its center, attached to a boom. The boom restric...

  • Aluminum LED Matrix Looks Professionally Made

    Aluminum LED Matrix Looks Professionally Made

    hackaday.com 22 Apr '14, 8am

    He’s using a set of 16 Adafruit 8×8 NeoPixel LED Matrices (almost $600 worth of LEDs) and a BeagleBone Black to control them. To mount the LED matrices he bought a sheet of 6061-T6 aluminum for two purposes — one to act as a giant heatsink, and two, to look cool. All he had to do was ...

  • Final Transmission

    Final Transmission

    hackaday.com 22 Apr '14, 7am

    Manual transmission for gamers Ultrasonic Data Transmission With GNU Radio Building a Final Key Fubarino Contest: Serial Data Transmission

  • Building a Final Key

    Building a Final Key

    hackaday.com 22 Apr '14, 5am

    Remembering passwords is a pain, and there’s a number of devices out there to make it easier. If you’re looking to roll your own, this guide to building a Final Key will walk you through the process. We talked about the Final Key before . It’s a one button password manager that encryp...

  • Sci-Fi Contest Roundup: The Valve Universe

    Sci-Fi Contest Roundup: The Valve Universe

    hackaday.com 22 Apr '14, 2am

    While most of the entries to our Sci-Fi contest come from movies and TV shows, a select few are based on the Valve universe, including a few builds based on Portal and Team Fortress 2. Deadly neurotoxin Who wouldn’t want a gigantic articulated sociopathic robot hanging around? Two gro...

  • Rebuilding a Custom IC Saves HP Pulse Generator

    Rebuilding a Custom IC Saves HP Pulse Generator

    hackaday.com 21 Apr '14, 11pm

    If you haven’t figured it out yet, [Matthew] is a persistent fellow. While setting up for wire bonding, he’d gotten a good look at that HP die. The HP chip was a relatively simple design, so simple that he was able to reverse engineer the entire schematic from the die images. Similar ...

  • Sniping 2.4GHz

    Sniping 2.4GHz

    hackaday.com 21 Apr '14, 8pm

    A long time ago when WiFi and Bluetooth were new and ‘wardriving’ was still a word, a few guys put a big antenna on a rifle and brought it to DefCon. Times have changed, technology has improved, and now [Hunter] has built his own improved version . The original sniper Yagi was a simpl...

  • Developed on Hackaday: Vote for your Favorite Card Art

    Developed on Hackaday: Vote for your Favorite Card Art

    hackaday.com 21 Apr '14, 5pm

    A few weeks ago we asked our dear readers if they were interested in coming up with some card art for the Mooltipass project . We received more than a dozen of them and a few days ago the HaD project Mooltipass followers/Mooltipas Google group recipients voted for their favorite ones....

  • Using Public Data to Make Laser Cut Maps

    hackaday.com 21 Apr '14, 4pm

    If you have access to a laser cutter you’re going to want to take a look at this brilliant tutorial. [Steven Smethurst] has figured out how to extract public map data and turn it into a file ready to be laser cut onto your choice of material. In his example he’s using Vancouver’s Open...

  • Using Public Data to Make Laser Cut Maps

    hackaday.com 21 Apr '14, 2pm

    If you have access to a laser cutter you’re going to want to take a look at this brilliant tutorial. [Steven Smethurst] has figured out how to extract public map data and turn it into a file ready to be laser cut onto your choice of material. In his example he’s using Vancouver’s Open...

  • New post: What’s Inside a USB Isolator?

    What’s Inside a USB Isolator?

    hackaday.com 21 Apr '14, 11am

    [Lindsay] followed [Ben Krasnow]‘s video tutorial on how to decap chips, but replaced the nitric acid with concentrated sulphuric acid, which is a bit easier to obtain. The process involves heating the chip while applying an acid. Over time, the packaging material is dissolved leaving...

  • VoLumen — The Most Advanced Persistence of Vision Display Yet

    hackaday.com 21 Apr '14, 8am

    Whoa. We’re just blown away by this new project by [Maximilian Mali] and [Sebastian Haushofer]. It’s a stacked Persistance of Vision display, with 9 layers — effectively creating a Volumetric 3D POV Display. We recently shared one of [Maximilian's] other projects, The Ripper CNC Machi...

  • Sublime Text as an Arduino IDE

    hackaday.com 21 Apr '14, 5am

    If you’ve played with an Arduino, you’ve probably been frustrated by the IDE. It works, but it’s not the best editor. It’s especially painful for bigger files and larger projects. The Stino plugin for Sublime Text aims to solve this issue by bringing the full functionality of the Ardu...

  • The Raspberry Eye Sees All

    The Raspberry Eye Sees All

    hackaday.com 21 Apr '14, 2am

    To create the HUD, he’s using a semi-transparent mirror which he took out of an Eye of Horus Beamsplitter game – which is a really cool real-life puzzle board game like those games where you have to reflect the laser to solve a puzzle. He’s then using a 3x Fresnel magnification lens w...

  • Hackaday Links: April 20, 2014

    hackaday.com 20 Apr '14, 11pm

    And finally, we’re still really fond of this 2-bit paper processor that helps you wrap your brain around what’s going on with those silicon wafers that rule our everyday lives. [glomCo] liked it as well, and actually coded an emulator so that you can play with it without printing anyt...

  • Sci-Fi Contest Roundup: Stargate

    hackaday.com 20 Apr '14, 8pm

    The 90s were a remarkable time for Sci-Fi movies, in that there actually were sci-fi movies, and not sequels to a reboot of yet another comic book movie. One of the breakout hits from this era was Stargate , the film and three syndicated television series. With a corpus this large, a ...

  • Blinky LED Necklace That Actually Looks Chic

    Blinky LED Necklace That Actually Looks Chic

    hackaday.com 20 Apr '14, 5pm

    I’ve helped my cousin with a couple of projects while she was at the FIT in New York. Few things we noticed when trying to play with fashion and light and trying to make it look not nerdy. The led shouldnt be the cool part of your fashion object, they are just an accent. Hide the led ...