hackaday.com Archives - 20 October 2014, Monday

  • Using the Wrong Screw: A Painful Lesson in iPhone Repair

    Using the Wrong Screw: A Painful Lesson in iPhone Repair

    hackaday.com 19 Oct '14, 8pm

    If you’ve ever had to repair an iPhone for a friend, you’ll know they have a ridiculous number of screws. Most companies standardize screws in their products, but since Apple doesn’t expect you to fix a phone yourself… they may have let this one slide. You see, each of these screws is...

  • Robot Arm You Can Build At Home

    Robot Arm You Can Build At Home

    hackaday.com 19 Oct '14, 5pm

    [jjshortcut] has created an easy to make robot arm that has 6 degrees of freedom. There is not much to it, the frame is made out of 4mm thick hardboard, hobby servos provide the power and a handful of hardware holds it together. The frame has been successfully cut out on both a laser ...

  • Delving Into the Design and Manufacture of a Keyboard

    Delving Into the Design and Manufacture of a Keyboard

    hackaday.com 19 Oct '14, 2pm

    A while back [Dave] decided he wanted to build his own keyboard. [Dave] has no experience in design, or dealing with manufacturing companies, or even sourcing materials – he just wanted to see if he could do it. That’s the beauty of the DIY world – most of the time, you can do it , yo...

  • Playing Doom (Poorly) on a VoCore

    Playing Doom (Poorly) on a VoCore

    hackaday.com 19 Oct '14, 11am

    Last May brought the unastonishing news that companies were taking the Systems on Chip found in $20 wireless routers and making dev boards out of them. The first of these is the VoCore, an Indiegogo campaign for a 360MHz CPU with 8MB of Flash and 32MB or RAM packaged in a square inch ...

  • DIY Vacuum Former On The Cheap

    DIY Vacuum Former On The Cheap

    hackaday.com 19 Oct '14, 8am

    Vacuum Forming is a process used to mold plastic into a desired shape. A thin sheet of plastic is heated to a soft state and then air pressure is used to press the plastic down around or into a mold. Vacuum forming can be used to make a variety of items, anything from product packagin...

  • Replacing the Lead in a Motorcycle Battery with Supercaps

    Replacing the Lead in a Motorcycle Battery with Supercaps

    hackaday.com 19 Oct '14, 5am

    [Raphael] has a motorcycle he’s constantly working on, and for him that means replacing the battery occasionally. Tired of the lead-acid batteries that have been used for 100 years now, he took a look at some of the alternatives, namely lithium and the much cooler supercapacitor optio...

  • The Network of 1-Wire Devices

    The Network of 1-Wire Devices

    hackaday.com 19 Oct '14, 2am

    [jimmayhugh] is a homebrewer and has multiple fermentation chambers and storage coolers scattered around his home. Lucky him. Nevertheless, multiple ways of making and storing beer requires some way to tell the temperature of his coolers and fermenters. There aren’t many temperature c...

  • This Analog Cambot Plays Outside the Lines

    This Analog Cambot Plays Outside the Lines

    hackaday.com 18 Oct '14, 11pm

    There are quite a few flavors of line following robot. No matter how they’re made, most are built for speed and accuracy. The Cambot by [Jorge Fernandez] however makes use of a traditional video camera to read visual input instead of the reflective sensors we’re used to seeing in thes...

  • The Economics of Fuzz Testing with the Intel Edison

    The Economics of Fuzz Testing with the Intel Edison

    hackaday.com 18 Oct '14, 8pm

    The Intel Edison is an incredibly small and cheap x86 computing platform, and with that comes the obvious applications for robotics and wearable computing. [mz] had another idea: what if the Edison could do work that is usually done by workstations? Would it make economic sense to buy...

  • Don’t You Just Love Comic Sans?

    Don’t You Just Love Comic Sans?

    hackaday.com 18 Oct '14, 5pm

    Trick question! Of course you do, everyone loves Comic Sans! It’s only like the best font in the history of the internet! Why would you ever use anything else? Oh! Is it because you feel like writing your novella on a computer is cheating? You wish you could use Comic Sans on your cla...

  • This Message Will Self-Destruct in 5 Seconds

    This Message Will Self-Destruct in 5 Seconds

    hackaday.com 18 Oct '14, 2pm

    Good morning, Mr. Hunt. Your mission, should you choose to accept it… blah blah blah… This post will self-destruct in five seconds. This is [Diego Trujillo Pisanty's] latest project dubbed “This Tape Will Self-Destruct “, and it’s a fully functional small scale printer, whose media ca...

  • Creating a 2D Film with 3D Printed Frames

    Creating a 2D Film with 3D Printed Frames

    hackaday.com 18 Oct '14, 11am

    [Julien’s] intricately built projection reel in itself is an impressive mechanical feat, arguably out-staging the image it exists to produce on the wall of the gallery space. The eighty-five individual frames that create the short clip of a man digging a hole in the ground, consist of...

  • Simple Photo Flash Trigger for Water Balloon Photography - #arduino

    Simple Photo Flash Trigger for Water Balloon Photography

    hackaday.com 18 Oct '14, 10am

    There have been countless projects to make custom photo flash trigger circuits. Usually the circuits react to sound, triggering the camera flash at the moment a certain sound is triggered. That type of trigger can be used to detect the popping of a balloon or shattering of glass. Othe...

  • Reverse Engineering a Bathroom Scale for Automated Weight Tracking

    Reverse Engineering a Bathroom Scale for Automated Weight Tracking

    hackaday.com 18 Oct '14, 8am

    [Darell] recently purchased a fancy new bathroom scale. Unlike an average bathroom scale, this one came with a wireless digital display. The user stands on the scale and the base unit transmits the weight measurement to the display using infrared signals. The idea is that you can plac...

  • 3D Printing Goes Hand in Hand with Iron Man Inspired Prosthetic

    3D Printing Goes Hand in Hand with Iron Man Inspired Prosthetic

    hackaday.com 18 Oct '14, 5am

    It’s exciting how much 3D printing has enabled us to produce pretty much any shape for any purpose on the fly. Among the most thoughtful uses for the technology that we’ve seen are the many functioning and often beautiful prosthetics that not only succeed in restoring the use of a lim...

  • Open-Source Water Quality Tester

    Open-Source Water Quality Tester

    hackaday.com 18 Oct '14, 2am

    Contaminated water is a huge problem in many third-world countries. Impure water leads to many serious health problems, especially in children. Installing a water purification system seems like a simple solution to this problem, but choosing the right purification system depends on th...

  • Guitar Pedal Hack via Manufacturer’s Shortcut

    Guitar Pedal Hack via Manufacturer’s Shortcut

    hackaday.com 17 Oct '14, 11pm

    There seems to be no shortage of manufacturers that cut costs by using similar components across a wide range of products. This isn’t necessarily a bad thing though, since it makes it easier for someone with some know-how to quickly open up the product and figure out how to get more u...

  • Anonabox: How To Fail Horribly at Kickstarter

    hackaday.com 17 Oct '14, 8pm

    I don’t know if my point really came across correctly but let me illustrate the point by a story from Defcon 2014. This one guy was hired by a corporation to try to infiltrate their facilities. The main floor and all major doors were monitored, guarded, IDs checked etc. But in the bac...

  • Introducing the F*Watch, a Fully Open Electronic Watch

    Introducing the F*Watch, a Fully Open Electronic Watch

    hackaday.com 17 Oct '14, 2pm

    As one of their colleagues was retiring, several CERN engineers got together after hours during 4 months to develop his gift: a fully open electronic watch . It is called the F*Watch and is packed with sensors: GPS, barometer, compass, accelerometer and light sensor. The microcontroll...

  • Detect Cosmic Rays with Your Smartphone Using CRAYFIS

    Detect Cosmic Rays with Your Smartphone Using CRAYFIS

    hackaday.com 17 Oct '14, 11am

    [Daniel Whiteson and Michael Mulhearn] and colleagues noted that smartphone cameras with CMOS sensors can detect ionizing radiation, which means they also will pick up muons and high-energy photons from cosmic rays. The ubiquitous presence of smartphones makes their collective detecti...

  • Controlling a Quadcopter with Gestures

    Controlling a Quadcopter with Gestures

    hackaday.com 17 Oct '14, 2am

    [grassjelly] has been hard at work building a wearable device that uses gestures to control quadcopter motion. The goal of the project is to design a controller that allows the user to intuitively control the motion of a quadcopter. Based on the demonstration video below, we’d say the...

  • Microbial Fuel Cell with a Side of Betta Fish

    Microbial Fuel Cell with a Side of Betta Fish

    hackaday.com 16 Oct '14, 8pm

    The 300-600mV is, presumably, the open-circuit voltage; I wonder how much current one could actually draw from this contraption. I must say I’m a bit sceptical; with some ions in the water (from the soil, mostly), the mesh screen and copper electrode might just form a pair of galvanic...

  • Robotic Terminator Teddy Will Protect You While You Sleep

    Robotic Terminator Teddy Will Protect You While You Sleep

    hackaday.com 16 Oct '14, 8am

    [Erwin] achieves several degrees of motion throughout the bear’s body by filling the skin with a series of 3D printed bones, conjoined by servo motors at its shoulders, elbows and neck. The motors are controlled via an Arduino running slave to a custom application written in C#. This ...

  • Palatable Pallet Procurement Procedures

    hackaday.com 16 Oct '14, 2am

    I was in shipping for a long time. Some pallets are amazing. It is pretty rare, maybe 1 in 500 at best, but when you find it, it will blow your mind as to why anyone would waste quality wood like that. I have seen prime, checkless, cherry, red oak, white oak (most common), heavy as al...

  • Margarita Drip Infuser Ensures a Perfect Mix

    Margarita Drip Infuser Ensures a Perfect Mix

    hackaday.com 15 Oct '14, 5am

    In order to get a margarita just right, the various ingredients need to be mixed together quite vigorously to over-come the different viscosity of the fluids. Looking to create his own barbot of sorts, [TVMiller] decided to make a Margarita Drip Infuser to help make margaritas a bit e...

  • Homer Robot Ensures You Don’t Miss An Episode

    Homer Robot Ensures You Don’t Miss An Episode

    hackaday.com 15 Oct '14, 2am

    Like the real Homer, not too much is going on up in this toy’s noggin. A couple of IR emitters are mounted in place of pupils and the associated wires are run down into his body. Right between a pink donut and a Krusty burger resides an Arduino and ethernet shield. This electronic duo...

  • DIY Auto Fish Feeder Feeds Fish Automatically

    DIY Auto Fish Feeder Feeds Fish Automatically

    hackaday.com 14 Oct '14, 11pm

    [Brian] has a fairly large 400 liter aquarium and loves the fish that call it home. Unfortunately, sometimes life gets in the way of keeping those fish fed on a regular basis. There are automatic fish feeders out there on the market and [Brian] gave one a try. Although it worked, it d...

  • TwoBitCircus: The Business of Building Interactive Entertainment

    hackaday.com 14 Oct '14, 8pm

    What was most interesting about TwoBitCircus for me as a maker of things was how these guys have turned their hobby into a thriving events business. Brent tells us that they’ve been at this for 8 years now and the company has been around for 3. They’re doing pretty well too, making in...

  • Retrotechtacular: Core Competencies

    Retrotechtacular: Core Competencies

    hackaday.com 14 Oct '14, 5pm

    As the dashing officer shown above will tell you, early data processing machines and ADP systems employed two types of magnetic cores for memory and other purposes. This 1961 U.S. Army training film is an introduction to the properties of ferrite cores , which are commonly made from n...

  • A Clever Cardboard Computer

    A Clever Cardboard Computer

    hackaday.com 14 Oct '14, 2pm

    Back in the 70’s when computers were fairly expensive and out of reach for most people, [David Hagelbarger] of Bell Laboratories designed CARDIAC: CARDboard Illustrative Aid to Computation . CARDIAC was designed as an educational tool to give people without access to computers the abi...