hackaday.com Archives - 04 August 2015, Tuesday

  • Cooking with Shop Tools: Most Dangerous Breakfast | Hackaday

    hackaday.com 04 Aug '15, 3pm

    In a rather comical video, [Dom] and [Chris] of [ExplosiveDischarge] show us how to make a full English breakfast — without the use of a kitchen. We’re talking eggs, bacon, ham, hash browns, and baked beans. Without the use of a single cooking element. Some of the methods were expecte...

  • Embed with Elliot: the Static Keyword You Don’t Fully Understand | Hackaday

    hackaday.com 04 Aug '15, 2pm

    Static changes the linkage (storage class) of the object it’s attached to. An “auto” (or “register”) variable means “translation-unit (file) visibility, and local (function) storage.” Declaring a variable static inside a function means “this has translation-unit (file) visibility, but...

  • Engineers Create Super-Hard Whack-a-Mole

    Engineers Create Super-Hard Whack-a-Mole | Hackaday

    hackaday.com 04 Aug '15, 11am

    Is your latest project driving you mad? Are you subject to occasional fits of rage? This project might help: for a class called elecanisms at Olin College, [Forrest] made a whack-a-mole arcade game that lets you vent your rage on a helpless furry animal by whacking it with a large ham...

  • Clocking (or Overclocking) an AVR | Hackaday

    hackaday.com 04 Aug '15, 8am

    Oh and here is another “overclocking” tip: 1N4001, rated to 50V of reverse voltage can work OK at 100V. No kidding, just try it. Such as magic in single PN junction, now imagine tens thousands of them in single package. Pushing the MCU out of specs doesn’t mean it will crash completel...

  • Hackaday Prize Entry: Wearable Electrodermal Activity Monitor | Hackaday

    hackaday.com 04 Aug '15, 5am

    Electrodermal activity, or galvanic skin response has a lot of practical applications. Everything from research into emotional states to significantly more off-the-wall applications like the E-meter use electrodermal activity. For his Hackaday Prize entry, [qquuiinn] is building a wea...

  • Caption CERN Contest – All Good Things…

    Caption CERN Contest – All Good Things… | Hackaday

    hackaday.com 04 Aug '15, 4am

    Week 25 of the Caption CERN Contest is complete . Thanks to all the entrants who tried to figure out exactly what is going on with this scientist and his strange box. We’re still just as confused (and amused) as you are. He definitely is focused on the box and whatever is in there. So...

  • Building a Battery from Molten Salt | Hackaday

    hackaday.com 04 Aug '15, 2am

    During World War II a scientist named Georg Otto Erb developed the molten salt battery for use in military applications. The war ended before Erb’s batteries found any real use, but British Intelligence wrote a report about the technology and the United States adopted the technology f...

  • Dissolve Steel Drill Bits in Alum from the Grocery | Hackaday

    hackaday.com 03 Aug '15, 11pm

    Useful notes from another post: “You can dissolve ferrous metals out of non-ferrous metals (such as aluminum, bronze, etc.) with alum (potassium aluminum sulfate). It’s a sour tasting pickling spice sold at grocery stores (try your local food co-op) that helps crisp pickled vegetables...

  • RIP: HitchBot

    RIP: HitchBot | Hackaday

    hackaday.com 03 Aug '15, 8pm

    Equal parts art project and social media experiment, with a dash of backyard hackery “robotics” thrown in for good measure, hitchBot was an experiment in the kindness of strangers. That is, the kindness of strangers toward a beer bucket filled with a bunch of electronics with a cute L...

  • How CMOS Works: MOSFETs, JFETs, IGFETS and More

    How CMOS Works: MOSFETs, JFETs, IGFETS and More | Hackaday

    hackaday.com 03 Aug '15, 5pm

    The High Impedance on the input, I.E. the lack of a load resistance to a ground, means that a little bit of static charge on something like the human finger, can actually be disastrous for an unprotected CMOS circuit. A simple spark or otherwise invisible charge can ruin a MOS based d...

  • The Right Way to Do A Hacker Conference | Hackaday

    hackaday.com 03 Aug '15, 3pm

    A badge and lab equipment don’t necessarily make a party. The Whiskey Pirates have that covered too. The workstations can be pushed to the side as the party gets going. They open their room at 3pm every day (assuming one of them is on hand), but the party really gets started after hou...

  • Hacking the Digital and Social System | Hackaday

    hackaday.com 03 Aug '15, 2pm

    Like I said… I’m not a fan but you’re comparing apples to earthworms. ACA is crap, the Supreme Court are Obamas lapdogs doing as he *tells* them but it’s a consequence of the system we have but we get what we deserve… the democrats just play the game better than the republicans do and...

  • Virtual Physical Rehab with Kinect | Hackaday

    hackaday.com 03 Aug '15, 11am

    Web sites have figured out that “gamifying” things increases participation. For example, you’ve probably boosted your postings on a forum just to get a senior contributor badge (that isn’t even really a badge, but a picture of one). Now [Yash Soni] has brought the same idea to physica...

  • How to Rescue Your Quadcopter from a Tree

    How to Rescue Your Quadcopter from a Tree | Hackaday

    hackaday.com 03 Aug '15, 8am

    Whether it’s a new rocket, your latest quadcopter, or [Charlie Brown]’s kite, it always seems like there’s a tree waiting to catch and eat airborne projects. Sometimes you get lucky and find a way to climb up the tree to retrieve your wayward build, but most times you’re reduced to lo...

  • Shinewave Gamecube Controller Reacts to Smash Brothers

    Shinewave Gamecube Controller Reacts to Smash Brothers | Hackaday

    hackaday.com 02 Aug '15, 2pm

    [Garrett Greenwood] plays Smash Brothers, and apparently quite seriously. So seriously that he needed to modify his controller with five Neopixels so that it flashed different color animations according to the combo he’s playing on the controller; tailored to match the colors of the m...

  • Homemade High Voltage Caps | Hackaday

    hackaday.com 02 Aug '15, 11am

    Do you happen to have any 15,000 volt capacitors sitting around? [Ludic Science] didn’t so he did the next best thing. He built some . If you understand the physics behind a capacitor (two parallel conductors separated by a dielectric) you won’t find the build process very surprising....

  • I am a Battery: Harvesting Heat Energy | Hackaday

    hackaday.com 02 Aug '15, 8am

    If you get tired of charging batteries, you might be interested in [Hackarobot’s] energy harvesting demo . He uses a peltier device (although he’s really using it as a thermocouple which it is). A 1 farad super capacitor stores energy and an LTC3108 ultra low voltage converter with a ...

  • Hackaday Prize Entry: Real Time Power Monitoring | Hackaday

    hackaday.com 02 Aug '15, 5am

    The Internet of Things promises real-time monitoring of appliances, HVAC, and just about everything else in the home. One of the biggest technologies behind this is the smart meter, an electrical meter that will tell you how much power you’re sucking down from the grid at any given mo...

  • It Sucks to Pick Up the Pieces

    It Sucks to Pick Up the Pieces | Hackaday

    hackaday.com 02 Aug '15, 2am

    Jigsaw puzzles are a fun and interactive way to spend an afternoon or twelve, depending on the piece count and your skill level. It’s exciting to find the pieces you need to complete a section or link two areas together, but if you have poor dexterity, excitement can turn to frustrati...

  • The Self-Balancing Sideways Segway

    The Self-Balancing Sideways Segway | Hackaday

    hackaday.com 01 Aug '15, 11pm

    [Jason Dorie] has been hard at work on his two-wheeled, self-balancing skateboard. He calls it the Sideway. Similar to the Segway, it relies on the user shifting their weight to control the speed at which it will run. A Wii Nunchuk controller is used to steer, which varies each wheels...

  • Teach Yourself Verilog with this Tiny CPU Design | Hackaday

    hackaday.com 01 Aug '15, 9pm

    You probably couldn’t write a decent novel if you’d never read a novel. Learning to do something often involves studying what other people did before you. One problem with trying to learn new technology is finding something simple enough to start your studies. [InfiniteNOP] wanted to ...

  • Teach Yourself Verilog with this Tiny CPU Design | Hackaday

    hackaday.com 01 Aug '15, 8pm

    You probably couldn’t write a decent novel if you’d never read a novel. Learning to do something often involves studying what other people did before you. One problem with trying to learn new technology is finding something simple enough to start your studies. [InfiniteNOP] wanted to ...

  • Everything You Wanted to Know About Oscillators | Hackaday

    hackaday.com 01 Aug '15, 5pm

    Ever wonder how a crystal oscillator works? How does that little metal can with a sliver of quartz start vibrating to produce a clock signal for just about everything we use, while doing it in the accuracy range in the parts per million and cost practically nothing? Well [Craig] decid...

  • Amazon Echo Orders the Roku About | Hackaday

    hackaday.com 01 Aug '15, 3pm

    You can add the Roku media player to the list of devices that can be bossed about by the Amazon Echo and its built-in AI: Alexa. [Julian Hartline] has figured out how to use Amazon’s voice-controlled Echo device with a Roku media player . He did this by using the Alexa Skills Kit , th...

  • The Countdown Begins — Last Two Weeks for Entries | Hackaday

    hackaday.com 01 Aug '15, 2pm

    Procrastination is a wonderful thing, but now is the time to stop delaying. Get those hacks documented and entered in the 2015 Hackaday Prize. We’ll close entries in just about two weeks. There’s a handy little countdown on the Prize page which lets you know that your entry must be in...

  • Principals of #hydraulic steering #retrotechtacular

    Retrotechtacular: Principles of Hydraulic Steering | Hackaday

    hackaday.com 01 Aug '15, 11am

    Have you ever had the pleasure of trying to steer a one-ton pickup from the 1940s or wondered how hard it would be to turn your car without power-assisted steering? As military vehicles grew larger and heavier in WWII, the need arose for some kind of assistance in steering them. This ...

  • 3D Printed Bristle Bots (Robot Cockroaches!) | Hackaday

    hackaday.com 01 Aug '15, 11am

    Bristlebots are one of our favorite projects to teach young hackers the basics of electronics. They’re easy to build, fun, and most importantly — cute. Usually you make them out of the head of an old toothbrush and a cellphone vibrating motor, but [Kevin Osborn] figured out a way to 3...

  • Build Your Own Function Generator

    Build Your Own Function Generator | Hackaday

    hackaday.com 01 Aug '15, 8am

    function generator builds before. [Scullcom]’s design complements these well by providing a detailed description of the design he used, and has provided full schematics and code from the Arduino Nano used in this project. The design covers audio frequencies (~40Hz to 30KHz) with squar...

  • Hackaday Prize Entry: 10 Watt Individually Addressable RGB LEDs | Hackaday

    hackaday.com 01 Aug '15, 5am

    Individually addressable RGB LEDs like Neopixels, WS2812s, and WS2811s are the defacto standard for making blinkey glowey projects. To build a very bright display, you need a lot of them, relegating very bright RGB displays to those of us who can afford the hardware and figure out how...

  • Human Gestures Control this Robot Arm

    Human Gestures Control this Robot Arm | Hackaday

    hackaday.com 01 Aug '15, 2am

    [Ray Kampmeier] just finished writing some code to allow him to control his robotic arm using force-sensitive hand gestures! He calls it the Robo Marionette. He’s using a MeArm 4 DOF robotic arm, a Sensel touch interface, an Arduino Uno, and a servo shield for the Arduino to control t...