hackaday.com Archives - 17 January 2017, Tuesday

  • Shmoocon 2017: Software Defined Radio for Terahertz Frequencies

    Shmoocon 2017: Software Defined Radio for Terahertz Frequencies | Hackaday

    hackaday.com 17 Jan '17, 12am

    Before Bluetooth, before the Internet of Things, and before network-connected everything, infrared was king. In the 90s, personal organizers, keyboards, Furbys, and critical infrastructure was built on infrared. Some of these devices are still around, hiding in plain sight. This means...

  • Cordless Drill Uses no Electricity

    Cordless Drill Uses no Electricity | Hackaday

    hackaday.com 16 Jan '17, 9pm

    There are few projects on how to make your own cordless drill, but what sets [Johnnyq90’s] amazing project apart is the fact that his power plant is a nitro engine. Not an easy task of course, but he makes it look easier than it is, and we really enjoyed the construction process. He u...

  • Shmoocon 2017: Dig Out Your Old Brick Phone | Hackaday

    hackaday.com 16 Jan '17, 7pm

    The 90s were a wonderful time for portable communications devices. Cell phones had mass, real buttons, and thick batteries – everything you want in next year’s flagship phone. Unfortunately, Zach Morris’ phone hasn’t been able to find a tower for the last decade, but that doesn’t mean...

  • Review: Hammer-Installed Solderless Raspberry Pi Pin Headers | Hackaday

    hackaday.com 16 Jan '17, 6pm

    ahhh… and that is exactly why we should not be using solderless headers!!! The raspberry pi was intended to be learning material, to introduce young people to computers. To teach them something about electronics and technology. Reading your experience with a soldering iron I can only ...

  • The ARRL Raises A Stink About Illegal FPV Transmitters | Hackaday

    hackaday.com 16 Jan '17, 4pm

    We have all been beneficiaries of the boom in availability of cheap imported electronics over the last decade. It is difficult to convey to someone under a certain age the step change in availability of parts and modules that has come about as a result of both the growth of Chinese ma...

  • Raspberry Pi Launches Compute Module 3 | Hackaday

    hackaday.com 16 Jan '17, 12pm

    The forgotten child of the Raspberry Pi family finally has an update. The Raspberry Pi Compute Module 3 has been launched . The Pi 3 Compute Module was teased all the way back in July , and what we knew then is just about what we know now. The new Compute Module is based on the BCM283...

  • A Simple Route To A Plug Top Pi | Hackaday

    hackaday.com 16 Jan '17, 9am

    There are a host of tiny plug-top computers available for the experimenter who requires an all-in-one mains-powered computing platform without the annoyance of a full-sized PC or similar. But among the various models there has always been something missing, a plug-top Raspberry Pi. To...

  • An Intel 8085 Microprocessor Trainer

    An Intel 8085 Microprocessor Trainer | Hackaday

    hackaday.com 16 Jan '17, 6am

    The Intel 8085 microprocessor was introduced 40 years back, and along with its contemporaries — the Z80 and the 6502 — is pretty much a dinosaur in terms of microprocessor history. But that doesn’t stop it from still being included in the syllabus for computer engineering students in ...

  • Alexa Keeps Pet Snake Thermoregulated

    Alexa Keeps Pet Snake Thermoregulated | Hackaday

    hackaday.com 16 Jan '17, 3am

    [Chris Grill] got his hands on a pet boa constrictor, which requires a fairly strict temperature controlled environment. Its enclosure needs to have a consistent temperature throughout, or the snake could have trouble regulating its body temperature. [Chris] wanted to keep tabs on the...

  • Shmoocon 2017: A Simple Tool For Reverse Engineering RF | Hackaday

    hackaday.com 15 Jan '17, 9pm

    Anyone can hack a radio, but that doesn’t mean it’s easy: there’s a lot of mechanics that go into formatting a signal before you can decode the ones and zeros. At his Shmoocon talk, [Paul Clark] introduced a great new tool for RF Reverse Engineering. It’s called WaveConverter , and it...

  • Shmoocon 2017: A Simple Tool For Reverse Engineering RF | Hackaday

    hackaday.com 15 Jan '17, 9pm

    Anyone can hack a radio, but that doesn’t mean it’s easy: there’s a lot of mechanics that go into formatting a signal before you can decode the ones and zeros. At his Shmoocon talk, [Paul Clark] introduced a great new tool for RF Reverse Engineering. It’s called WaveConverter , and it...

  • Garage Door Opener Logs to Google Drive | Hackaday

    hackaday.com 15 Jan '17, 6pm

    A garage door opener is a pretty classic hack around these parts. IR, Bluetooth, WiFi, smartphone controlled, web interfaces — we’ve seen it all. But if you want to keep track of people going in and out, you need some way of logging what’s happening. You could go ahead and roll up you...

  • Innocent TV Imprisoned Behind Mirror

    Innocent TV Imprisoned Behind Mirror | Hackaday

    hackaday.com 15 Jan '17, 4pm

    After following along with all the Magic Mirror builds, [Troy Denton] finally caved in and started building one for his girlfriend for Christmas. These popular builds are all pretty much bespoke, and this one is no different. His victim TV didn’t have the ability to be switched on and...

  • Fixing Bugs In A 37 Year Old Apple II Game | Hackaday

    hackaday.com 15 Jan '17, 3pm

    Emulators are a great way to reminisce about games and software from yesteryear. [Jorj Bauer] found himself doing just that back in 2002, when they decided to boot up Three Mile Island for the Apple II. It played well enough, but for some reason, crashed instantly if you happened to p...

  • Fixing Bugs In A 37 Year Old Apple II Game | Hackaday

    hackaday.com 15 Jan '17, 3pm

    Emulators are a great way to reminisce about games and software from yesteryear. [Jorj Bauer] found himself doing just that back in 2002, when they decided to boot up Three Mile Island for the Apple II. It played well enough, but for some reason, crashed instantly if you happened to p...

  • Shmoocon 2017: So You Want To Hack RF | Hackaday

    hackaday.com 15 Jan '17, 12pm

    Far too much stuff is wireless these days. Home security systems have dozens of radios for door and window sensors, thermostats aren’t just a wire to the furnace anymore, and we are annoyed when we can’t start our cars from across a parking lot. This is a golden era for anyone who wan...

  • Heavy Lift Electromagnet from Microwave Oven Transformers

    Heavy Lift Electromagnet from Microwave Oven Transformers | Hackaday

    hackaday.com 15 Jan '17, 9am

    It’s OK, you can admit it — from the time you first saw those huge electromagnetic cranes in scrap yards you’ve wanted to have one. While it may not fling around a car, parts donated from scrapped microwaves can let you build your own electromagnetic lifting device and make that dream...

  • Motorized Camera Dolly Rolls With the Changes

    Motorized Camera Dolly Rolls With the Changes | Hackaday

    hackaday.com 15 Jan '17, 6am

    Over the last semester, Cornell student [Ope Oladipo] had the chance to combine two of his passions: engineering and photography. He and teammates [Sacheth Hegde] and [Jason Zhang] used their time in [Bruce Land]’s class to build a motorized camera dolly for shooting time-lapse sequen...

  • Turning an IBM Selectric into a printer. | Hackaday

    hackaday.com 15 Jan '17, 3am

    This was fun to see. Great work! It brings back old memories for me. In the late 1970s, early 1980s I was developing a keyboard design (US Patent # 4,265,557) that would wrap the keys up around the typist’s fingers – the idea was to increase typing speed and accuracy, because the keys...

  • Smoothly Modernized Nixie Display

    Smoothly Modernized Nixie Display | Hackaday

    hackaday.com 15 Jan '17, 3am

    The renaissance of Nixie tube popularity amid the nostalgia surrounding older tech has made them almost prohibitively expensive for individual projects. Seeing an opportunity to modernize the beloved devices, [Connor Nishijima] has unleashed this new, LED edge-lit display that he has ...

  • Vintage IBM Daisywheel Prints Again after Reverse Engineering

    Vintage IBM Daisywheel Prints Again after Reverse Engineering | Hackaday

    hackaday.com 15 Jan '17, 12am

    Just before the dawn of the PC era, IBM typewriters reached their technical zenith with the Wheelwriter line. A daisy-wheel printer with interchangeable print heads, memory features, and the beginnings of word processing capabilities, the Wheelwriters never got much time to shine befo...

  • High-Power LED + 3D Printer = Mega Flashlight | Hackaday

    hackaday.com 14 Jan '17, 9pm

    If you remember old computer magazines (or browse them today), you’ll see that back in the late 1970s and early 1980s, you weren’t always sure what you were going to do with a computer. Games were a staple, but they weren’t very exciting. Visionaries talked about storing recipes, writ...

  • Foldable Dymaxion Globe

    Foldable Dymaxion Globe | Hackaday

    hackaday.com 14 Jan '17, 6pm

    Some time back, we posted about [Gavin]’s laser-cut/3D printed Dymaxion Globe — if you haven’t read about it yet, you should check it out. [noniq] loved the idea, and like a true hacker, built and shared an improved Foldable Dymaxion Globe . It can snap together to form an icosahedron...

  • Shmoocon 2017: On Not Reverse Engineering Through Emulation | Hackaday

    hackaday.com 14 Jan '17, 4pm

    Right now, I’m at Shmoocon, and it’s living up to all expectations. That’s a tall order — last year, the breakout talk was from [Travis Goodspeed] on his efforts to reverse engineer the firmware for a cheap Chinese radio. Four people in the room for that talk last year bought the radi...

  • Shmoocon 2017: On Not Reverse Engineering Through Emulation | Hackaday

    hackaday.com 14 Jan '17, 4pm

    Right now, I’m at Shmoocon, and it’s living up to all expectations. That’s a tall order — last year, the breakout talk was from [Travis Goodspeed] on his efforts to reverse engineer the firmware for a cheap Chinese radio. Four people in the room for that talk last year bought the radi...

  • C64 Keyboard Emulation Over Serial

    C64 Keyboard Emulation Over Serial | Hackaday

    hackaday.com 14 Jan '17, 3pm

    There’s a lot of reasons you might want to emulate the keyboard on your Commodore 64. The ravages of time and dust may have put the original keyboard out of order, or perhaps you need to type in a long program and don’t fancy pecking away with the less-than-stellar feedback of the sta...

  • Blob-less Raspberry Pi Linux Is A Step Closer | Hackaday

    hackaday.com 14 Jan '17, 12pm

    The Raspberry Pi single board computer has been an astounding success since its launch nearly five years ago, to the extent that as of last autumn it had sold ten million units with no sign of sales abating. It has delivered an extremely affordable and pretty powerful computer into th...

  • [Dave’s] Not Just a Member of the Air Club for Tweezers https://t.co/LVNHazoFkl

    [Dave’s] Not Just a Member of the Air Club for Tweezers | Hackaday

    hackaday.com 14 Jan '17, 9am

    We are always surprised how much useful hacking gear is in the typical craft store. You just have to think outside the box. Need a hot air gun? Think embossing tool. A soldering iron? Check the stained glass section. Magnification gear? Sewing department. We’ve figured out that people...

  • Custom Sensor Head Turns 3D Printer into Capacitive Scanner

    Custom Sensor Head Turns 3D Printer into Capacitive Scanner | Hackaday

    hackaday.com 14 Jan '17, 6am

    The best thing about owning a 3D printer or CNC router may not just be what you can additively or subtractively create with it. With a little imagination you can turn your machine into a 3D scanner, and using capacitive sensors to image items turns out to be an interesting project. [N...