hackaday.com Archives - 24 March 2017, Friday

  • We’re Hiring | Hackaday

    hackaday.com 24 Mar '17, 4pm

    Hackaday has been expanding into all kinds of new areas. We find ourselves stretched a bit thin and it’s time to ask for help. Want to lend a hand while making some extra dough to plow back into your projects? These are work-from-home (or wherever you like) positions and we’re looking...

  • Shut Up and Say Something: Amateur Radio Digital Modes

    Shut Up and Say Something: Amateur Radio Digital Modes | Hackaday

    hackaday.com 24 Mar '17, 2pm

    In a recent article , I lamented my distaste for carrying on the classic amateur radio conversation — calling CQ, having someone from far away or around the block call back, exchange call signs and signal reports and perhaps a few pleasantries. I think the idle chit-chat is a big turn...

  • Daunting Interactive LED Dancefloor Build is Huge Win | Hackaday

    hackaday.com 24 Mar '17, 11am

    If you’ve ever thought about having a light-up dance floor at an event, the chances are you will have been shocked at the rental cost. Doing your best impression of a young John Travolta in Saturday Night Fever doesn’t come cheap, it seems. When faced with this problem before the Furn...

  • Your VR Doesn’t Stink (Yet) | Hackaday

    hackaday.com 24 Mar '17, 8am

    What does it smell like when the wheels heat up on that Formula 1 car you drive at night and on the weekends? You have no idea because the Virtual Reality experience that lets you do so doesn’t come with a nasal component. Yet. Shown here is an olfactory device that works with Oculus ...

  • Pi Zero W Impersonates iPhone, Becomes Terminal

    Pi Zero W Impersonates iPhone, Becomes Terminal | Hackaday

    hackaday.com 24 Mar '17, 8am

    There’s something to be said for economies of scale and few things sell more than cell phones. Maybe that’s why [NODE] took inspiration from an iPhone slide out keyboard case to create this Pi Zero W-based portable terminal . This is actually his third iteration, and in the video belo...

  • See Satellites with a Simple Radio Telescope | Hackaday

    hackaday.com 24 Mar '17, 5am

    Now, don’t expect much from [Justin]’s minimalist build. After all, you’ll be starting with a rather small dish and an LNB for the Ku band, so you won’t be doing serious radio astronomy. In fact, the BOM doesn’t include a fancy receiver – just a hacked satellite finder. The idea is to...

  • See Satellites with a Simple Radio Telescope | Hackaday

    hackaday.com 24 Mar '17, 5am

    Now, don’t expect much from [Justin]’s minimalist build. After all, you’ll be starting with a rather small dish and an LNB for the Ku band, so you won’t be doing serious radio astronomy. In fact, the BOM doesn’t include a fancy receiver – just a hacked satellite finder. The idea is to...

  • Before There were Nixie Tubes, There Were Edge-Lit Displays? | Hackaday

    hackaday.com 24 Mar '17, 2am

    We’ve seen a bunch of replacements for nixie tubes using LEDs and edge-lit acrylic for the numbers. But one of the earliest digital voltmeters used edge-lit Lucite plates for the numbers and a lot of incandescent lamps to light them up. [stevenjohnson] has a Non-Linear Systems Model 4...

  • Soda Bottles Used as Heat-Shrink for Wood Joinery

    Soda Bottles Used as Heat-Shrink for Wood Joinery | Hackaday

    hackaday.com 23 Mar '17, 8pm

    Undertaken as an art project to show people what can be done with recycled materials, [Micaella Pedros]’ project isn’t a hack per se. She started with bottles collected around London and experimented with ways to use them in furniture. The plastic used in soda and water bottles, polye...

  • The Latest In 3D Printed Part Smoothing: Use A Brush | Hackaday

    hackaday.com 23 Mar '17, 6pm

    Part smoothing for 3D printed parts, especially parts printed in ABS, has been around for a while. The process of exposing an ABS part to acetone vapor turns even low-resolution prints into smooth, glossy 3D renderings that are stronger than ever. The latest improvement in part smooth...

  • Say It With Me: Aliasing | Hackaday

    hackaday.com 23 Mar '17, 5pm

    Nice summary of 1940’s work which still applies for most purposes. However, David Donoho and Emmanuel Candes changed everything in 2004. Aliasing is the result of periodic sampling in time using a comb function. The Fourier transform of which is also a comb. Multiplication in the time...

  • The Hard Way of Cassette Tape Auto-Reverse

    The Hard Way of Cassette Tape Auto-Reverse | Hackaday

    hackaday.com 23 Mar '17, 3pm

    The audio cassette is an audio format that presented a variety of engineering challenges during its tenure. One of the biggest at the time was that listeners had to physically remove the cassette and flip it over to listen to the full recording. Over the years, manufacturers developed...

  • Acoustic Coupler Pole-Vaults Over China's Firewall - Hackaday

    Acoustic Coupler Pole-Vaults Over China’s Firewall | Hackaday

    hackaday.com 23 Mar '17, 8am

    [agp.cooper]’s son recently went to China, and the biggest complaint was the Great Firewall of China. A VPN is a viable option to get around the Great Firewall of China, but [agp] had a better idea: an acoustic coupler for his son’s iPhone . Hackaday readers of a recent vintage might ...

  • Modern DIY FM radio

    Modern DIY FM radio | Hackaday

    hackaday.com 23 Mar '17, 5am

    Back in the day, building a DIY radio was fun! We only had to get our hands at a germanium diode, make some coils, and with a resistor and long wire as an antenna maybe we could get some sound out of those old white earplugs. That was back then. Now we have things like the Si4703 FM t...

  • Well Engineered Radio Clock Aces Form and Function

    Well Engineered Radio Clock Aces Form and Function | Hackaday

    hackaday.com 23 Mar '17, 2am

    Clocks that read time via received radio signals have several advantages over their Internet-connected, NTP-synchronised brethren. The radio signal is ubiquitous and available over a fairly large footprint extending to thousands of kilometres from the transmitting antennae. This allow...

  • android linux | Hackaday

    hackaday.com 23 Mar '17, 12am

    There was a time a few years ago when the first Android phones made it to market, that they seemed full of promise as general purpose computers. Android is sort of Linux, right, or so the story went, so of course you must be able to run Linux on an Android phone and do all sorts of co...

  • Bees in TVs

    Bees in TVs | Hackaday

    hackaday.com 22 Mar '17, 11pm

    Bees are a crucial part of the ecosystem – without bees to act as pollinators, many plant species wouldn’t be able to reproduce at all! It’s unfortunate then that bees are struggling to survive in many parts of the world. However, [Louise Cosgrove] is doing her part – building homes f...

  • From XP to 10, DoubleAgent pwns all your Windows?

    From XP to 10, DoubleAgent pwns all your Windows? | Hackaday

    hackaday.com 22 Mar '17, 8pm

    The Cybellum team published a new 0-day technique for injecting code and maintaining persistency on a target computer, baptized DoubleAgent . This technique uses a feature that all Windows versions since XP provide, that allows for an Application Verifier Provider DLL to be installed ...

  • An Android Phone Makes A Better Server Than You’d Think | Hackaday

    hackaday.com 22 Mar '17, 6pm

    There was a time a few years ago when the first Android phones made it to market, that they seemed full of promise as general purpose computers. Android is sort of Linux, right, or so the story went, so of course you must be able to run Linux on an Android phone and do all sorts of co...

  • How Does a Voltage Multiplier Work? | Hackaday

    hackaday.com 22 Mar '17, 5pm

    Not really needed. Diodes don’t instantly break from overvoltage, they start to leak some current first, and go into avalanche breakdown if the voltage keeps increasing. If a large current is allowed to flow (low source resistance), the dissipation (high voltage * high current) will d...

  • Dartboard Watches Your Throw; Catches Perfect Bullseyes | Hackaday

    hackaday.com 22 Mar '17, 3pm

    Some people really put a lot of effort into rigging the system. Why spend years practicing a skill and honing your technique to hit a perfect bullseye in darts when you can spend the time building an incredibly complicated auto-bullseye dartboard that’ll do it for you? In fairness, wh...

  • Shut the Backdoor! More IoT Cybersecurity Problems

    Shut the Backdoor! More IoT Cybersecurity Problems | Hackaday

    hackaday.com 22 Mar '17, 2pm

    We all know that what we mean by hacker around here and what the world at large thinks of as a hacker are often two different things. But as our systems get more and more connected to each other and the public Internet, you can’t afford to ignore the other hackers — the black-hats and...

  • Creepy Speaking Neural Networks

    Creepy Speaking Neural Networks | Hackaday

    hackaday.com 22 Mar '17, 11am

    Tech artist [Alexander Reben] has shared some work in progress with us. It’s a neural network trained on various famous peoples’ speech (YouTube, embedded below). [Alexander]’s artistic goal is to capture the “soul” of a person’s voice, in much the same way as death masks of centuries...

  • Making More Of Me Money

    Making More Of Me Money | Hackaday

    hackaday.com 22 Mar '17, 8am

    For the last few years, Hackaday has really been stepping up our game with marketing materials. Our t-shirts and swag are second to none, and last year we introduced the ‘Benchoff Buck’ (featured above), a bill replete with Jolly Wrencher EURions that is not yet legal currency. At lea...

  • Saturday Clock: An 0.000011574Hz ATtiny85 clock

    Saturday Clock: An 0.000011574Hz ATtiny85 clock | Hackaday

    hackaday.com 22 Mar '17, 5am

    In these times when we try to squeeze out extra clock cycles by adding more cores to our CPUs and by enlisting the aid of GPUs, [Ido Gendel] thought it would be fun to go in the exact opposite direction, supply a clock to the ATtiny85 that cycles only once per day , or at 0.000011574H...

  • Tiny Electric Motor Runs on Power from an LED

    Tiny Electric Motor Runs on Power from an LED | Hackaday

    hackaday.com 22 Mar '17, 2am

    If you were not aware, LEDs can also work in reverse: they deliver tiny amounts of current, in the microamp range, when illuminated. If you look on YouTube you can find several videos of solar panels built with arrays of LEDs, but powering an electric motor with a single 3 mm LED is s...

  • Bomb Defusal Fun With Friends! | Hackaday

    hackaday.com 21 Mar '17, 11pm

    Being a member of the bomb squad would be pretty high up when it comes to ranking stressful occupations. It also makes for great fun with friends. Keep Talking and Nobody Explodes is a two-player video game where one player attempts to defuse a bomb based on instructions from someone ...

  • Your VR Doesn’t Stink (Yet) | Hackaday

    hackaday.com 21 Mar '17, 8pm

    What does it smell like when the wheels heat up on that Formula 1 car you drive at night and on the weekends? You have no idea because the Virtual Reality experience that lets you do so doesn’t come with a nasal component. Yet. Shown here is an olfactory device that works with Oculus ...

  • Negative Resistance: It Shouldn’t Make Sense! https://t.co/lybHuJSbjZ

    Negative Resistance: It Shouldn’t Make Sense! | Hackaday

    hackaday.com 21 Mar '17, 5pm

    When you leaf through a basic electronics textbook, you’ll find chapters describing in detail the operation of the various components. Resistors, capacitors, inductors, and semiconductors. The latter chapter will talk about P and N type regions, introduce us to the diode, and then dea...

  • Cigar Box Opens to Raspberry Pi Laptop | Hackaday

    hackaday.com 21 Mar '17, 3pm

    I’m making a similar laptop from scratch. No cigar boxes, but I’m recycling a lot of parts from a very old broken laptop. I chose an Orange Pi for my laptop. I got the scavenged screen working with a Chinese TV controller board and some reverse engineering which turned out to be usele...