14 Oct '12, 4pm

Linux TCP/IP Tuning for Scalability

TCP connections go through various states during their lifetime. There’s the handshake that goes through multiple states, then the ESTABLISHED state, and then a whole bunch of states for either end to terminate the connection, and finally a TIME_WAIT state that lasts a really long time. If you’re interested in all the states, read through the netstat man page , but right now the only one we care about is the TIME_WAIT state, and we care about it mainly because it’s so long. By default, a connection is supposed to stay in the TIME_WAIT state for twice the msl . Its purpose is to make sure any lost packets that arrive after a connection is closed do not confuse the TCP subsystem (the full details of this are beyond the scope of this article, but ask me if you’d like details). The default msl is 60 seconds, which puts the default TIME_WAIT timeout value at 2 minutes. This mea...

Full article: http://www.engineyard.com/blog/2012/linux-scalability/?ey...

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Linux TCP/IP Tuning for Scalability

engineyard.com 12 Oct '12, 8pm

TCP connections go through various states during their lifetime. There’s the handshake that goes through multiple states, ...

Linux TCP/IP Tuning for Scalability

engineyard.com 12 Oct '12, 6pm

TCP connections go through various states during their lifetime. There’s the handshake that goes through multiple states, ...

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