hackaday.com Archives - 24 February 2017, Friday

  • Jean-Luc PYcARD is a Pocketable Python Development Platform

    Jean-Luc PYcARD is a Pocketable Python Development Platform | Hackaday

    hackaday.com 24 Feb '17, 3am

    It’s a good thing that a ridiculous pun and a screenprint of Jean-Luc Picard on the bottom of the board is enough to qualify for the 2017 Hackaday Sci-Fi Contest , because [bobricius]’s Python-plus-Arduino card and environmental sensor potpourri is very cool. The PCB design itself is ...

  • What Is This, A Battle-Bot For Ants?

    What Is This, A Battle-Bot For Ants? | Hackaday

    hackaday.com 24 Feb '17, 12am

    Instructables user [Team_Panic] — inspired by the resurgence of robot battle arena shows — wanted to dive in to his local ‘bot building club. Being that they fight at the UK ant weight scale with a cap of 150 grams, [Team_Panic] built a spunky little Arduino Mini-controlled bot on the...

  • Bring Saturday Mornings Back to Life with this Cartoon Server

    Bring Saturday Mornings Back to Life with this Cartoon Server | Hackaday

    hackaday.com 23 Feb '17, 7pm

    It was an American ritual for over four decades: wake up early on Saturday morning, prepare a bowl of sugar, and occupy the couch for four glorious hours of cartoons. The only interruptions came when the least-significant sibling had to be commanded to get up to change the channel to ...

  • What the Flux: How Does Solder Work Anyway?

    What the Flux: How Does Solder Work Anyway? | Hackaday

    hackaday.com 23 Feb '17, 6pm

    I’ve been soldering for a long time, and I take pride in my abilities. I won’t say that I’m the best solder-slinger around, but I’m pretty good at this essential shop skill — at least for through-hole and “traditional” soldering; I haven’t had much practice at SMD stuff yet. I’m confi...

  • @hackaday

    SHAttered — SHA-1 is broken | Hackaday

    hackaday.com 23 Feb '17, 4pm

    A team from Google and CWI Amsterdam just announced it: they produced the first SHA-1 hash collision . The attack required over 9,223,372,036,854,775,808 SHA-1 computations, the equivalent processing power as 6,500 years of single-CPU computations and 110 years of single-GPU computati...

  • Suddenly, Wireless Power Transmission Is Everywhere

    Suddenly, Wireless Power Transmission Is Everywhere | Hackaday

    hackaday.com 23 Feb '17, 3pm

    Wireless power transfer exists right now, but it’s not as cool as Tesla’s Wardenclyffe tower and it’s not as stupid as an OSHA-unapproved ultrasonic power transfer system . Wireless power transfer today is a Qi charger for your phone. It’s low power – just a few amps — and very short ...

  • Own the Night with this Open Source Night Vision Monocular

    Own the Night with this Open Source Night Vision Monocular | Hackaday

    hackaday.com 23 Feb '17, 12pm

    If you’ve always wanted to see in the dark but haven’t been able to score those perfect Soviet-era military surplus night vision goggles, you may be in luck. Now there’s an open-source night vision monocular that you can build to keep tabs on the nighttime goings-on in your yard. Wher...

  • Plasma Cutter Jig Notches Tubing Quickly and Cleanly

    Plasma Cutter Jig Notches Tubing Quickly and Cleanly | Hackaday

    hackaday.com 23 Feb '17, 9am

    We have to admit to a certain initial bafflement when watching the video below for the first time. We can usually see where [MakeItExtreme]’s builds are going right from the first pieces of stock that get cut, but the large tube with the pressed-in bearing had us scratching our heads....

  • Radio and Phone Speaker has Style

    Radio and Phone Speaker has Style | Hackaday

    hackaday.com 23 Feb '17, 3am

    Building a crystal radio isn’t exactly rocket science. Some people who build them go for pushing them technically as far as they can go. Others, like [Billy Cheung], go for style points. The modular radio and phone speaker looks like it came out of the movie Brazil. The metallic gramo...

  • diy arduino | Hackaday

    hackaday.com 23 Feb '17, 2am

    Have you ever wanted to build your own Arduino from scratch? [Pratik Makwana] shares the entire process of designing, building and flashing an Arduino Nano clone . This is not an entry-level project and requires some knowledge of soldering to succeed with such small components, but it...

  • Touch Sensitive Cement with Just a Dash of Neon

    Touch Sensitive Cement with Just a Dash of Neon | Hackaday

    hackaday.com 23 Feb '17, 12am

    For quite some time now we’ve seen people casting their own countertops and other surfaces out of cement. It’s a combination of mold-making and surface finishing that produces a smooth and durable surface at quite a low cost, if you don’t factor in damage done to your back when liftin...

  • Tales Of A Cheap Chinese Laser Cutter | Hackaday

    hackaday.com 22 Feb '17, 9pm

    The star turn of most hackspaces and other community workshops is usually a laser cutter. An expensive and fiddly device that it makes much more sense to own collectively than to buy yourself. This isn’t to say that laser cutters are outside the budget of the experimenter though, we’r...

  • From Zero to Nano

    From Zero to Nano | Hackaday

    hackaday.com 22 Feb '17, 7pm

    Have you ever wanted to build your own Arduino from scratch? [Pratik Makwana] shares the entire process of designing, building and flashing an Arduino Nano clone . This is not an entry-level project and requires some knowledge of soldering to succeed with such small components, but it...

  • Harmonographs Generate Geometric Images Unique as Fingerprints | Hackaday

    hackaday.com 22 Feb '17, 6pm

    When my elder brother and I were kids back in the late 1970’s, our hacker Dad showed us this 1960-61 catalog of the Atlas Lighting Co (later Thorn Lighting) with an interesting graphic design on the cover. He told us to do a thought experiment, asking us to figure out how it would be ...

  • Friday Hack Chat: Security for IoT | Hackaday

    hackaday.com 22 Feb '17, 5pm

    I think there’s a need for some cheap silicon designed to fill this niche that security can be automated and patched for automatically (very very important, or it’d just be another unpatched device to search for on shogan adding to the problem within a few months of design), and havin...

    Related:
    1. Rails Chat Application rubyflow.com 23 Feb '17, 2pm
  • MicroVox Puts the 80’s Back into Your Computer’s Voice | Hackaday

    hackaday.com 22 Feb '17, 4pm

    Talk about things from the past! 35 years ago. Microvox! OK, let me give you a little history. It was designed as a construction article by Steve Ciarcia in BYTE Magazine originally in September and October 1982 as part of the Ciarcia’s Circuit Cellar column in BYTE. The project is al...

  • Interview: Nacer Chahat Designs Antennae for Mars CubeSats

    Interview: Nacer Chahat Designs Antennas for Mars CubeSats | Hackaday

    hackaday.com 22 Feb '17, 3pm

    You have a shoe box sized computer that you want to use in a Mars fly by. How do you communicate with it? The answer is a very clever set of antennas. I got to sit down with Nacer Chahat, one of the engineers on the Jet Propulsion Laboratory team responsible for antenna design on Mars...

  • T-Rex Runner Runs on Transistor Tester

    T-Rex Runner Runs on Transistor Tester | Hackaday

    hackaday.com 22 Feb '17, 12pm

    If you’ve ever spent time online buying electronic doodads — which would mean almost all of us — then sooner or later, the websites get wind of your buying sprees and start offering “suggested” advertisements for buying more useless stuff. One commonly offered popular product seems to...

  • Moving Microns with a High Precision Linear Stage

    Moving Microns with a High Precision Linear Stage | Hackaday

    hackaday.com 22 Feb '17, 9am

    As anyone who has experimented with their own home-made CNC machinery will tell you, precision isn’t cheap. You can assemble a gantry mill using off-the-shelf threading and kitchen drawer slides. But it’s a safe assumption that if you put the tool at a particular position it won’t be ...

  • Zork Comes to Custom FPGA CPU (Again) | Hackaday

    hackaday.com 22 Feb '17, 6am

    [Robert Baruch] wanted to tackle a CPU project using an FPGA. One problem you always have is you can either mimic something that has tools and applications or you can go your own way and just build everything from scratch (which is much harder). [Robert] took the mimic approach–sort o...

  • Decimal Oscilloclock harks back to 1927 movie | Hackaday

    hackaday.com 22 Feb '17, 3am

    I have an old oscilloscope that uses tubes. I got it as a visual piece (I don’t obviously actually use it)… It’s tempting to try to come up with a use like this. It too has the round display, like the one in this article. I actually know very little about the long term durability of t...

  • Reverse Engineering Enables Slick Bluetooth Solution for Old Car Stereo

    Reverse Engineering Enables Slick Bluetooth Solution for Old Car Stereo | Hackaday

    hackaday.com 22 Feb '17, 12am

    There are plenty of ways to go about piping your favorite tunes from a phone to an old car stereo, but few are as nicely integrated as [Parker Dillmann]’s project. An aftermarket radio of newer vintage than the OEM stereo in his 1999 Jeep would be one way to go, but there’s no sport i...

  • A Real Star Trek Communicator Badge

    A Real Star Trek Communicator Badge | Hackaday

    hackaday.com 21 Feb '17, 9pm

    Star Trek has never let technology get in the way of a good story. Gene Roddenberry and the writers of the show thought up some amazing gadgets, from transporters to replicators to the warp core itself. Star Trek: The Next Generation brought us the iconic communicator badge. In 1987, ...

  • Microchip Launches New Family Of PICs | Hackaday

    hackaday.com 21 Feb '17, 7pm

    Over the last few years, we’ve seen projects and products slowly move from 8-bit microcontrollers to more powerful ARM microcontrollers. The reason for this is simple — if you want to do more stuff, like an Internet-connected toaster, you need more bits, more Flash, and more processin...

  • Ask Hackaday: Is Owning A 3D Printer Worth It? | Hackaday

    hackaday.com 21 Feb '17, 6pm

    I think this is a rather strange question to ask. Let me illustrate and ask a different but similar set of questions: “Are CNC mills ready for prime time?” “Is it possible for an average consumer to save money with a CNC mill?” “Are CNC mills easy to use if you are technologically ill...

  • Smaller Cheaper Arduino | Hackaday

    hackaday.com 21 Feb '17, 4pm

    Well, honestly, [Michael Mayer’s] STM8 Arduino (called Sduino ) isn’t actually much to do with the Arduino, except in spirit. The STM8 is an 8-bit processor. It is dirt cheap and has some special motor control features that are handy. There’s a significant library available for it. Ho...

  • First Look: Macchina M2

    First Look: Macchina M2 | Hackaday

    hackaday.com 21 Feb '17, 3pm

    In the past few years, we’ve seen a growth in car hacking. Newer tools are being released, which makes it faster and cheaper to get into automotive tinkering. Today we’re taking a first look at the M2, a new device from the folks at Macchina. The Macchina M1 was the first release of a...

  • A Full Speed, Portable Apple //e | Hackaday

    hackaday.com 21 Feb '17, 12pm

    A while back, [Jorj] caught wind of a Hackaday post from December. It was a handheld Apple IIe , emulated on an ATMega1284p. An impressive feat, no doubt, but it’s all wrong . This ATapple only has 12k of RAM and only runs at 70% of the correct speed. The ATapple is impressive, but [J...

  • Pancake-ROM: Eat-only Memory?

    Pancake-ROM: Eat-only Memory? | Hackaday

    hackaday.com 21 Feb '17, 9am

    You can store arbitrary data encoded in binary as a pattern of zeros and ones. What you do to get those zeros and ones is up to you. If you’re in a particularly strange mood, you could even store them as strips of chocolate on Swedish pancakes . Oddly enough, the possibility of the pa...

  • A 6502 Retrocomputer In A Very Tidy Package | Hackaday

    hackaday.com 21 Feb '17, 6am

    One of the designers whose work we see constantly in the world of retrocomputing is [Grant Searle], whose work on minimal chip count microcomputers has spawned a host of implementations across several processor families. Often a retrocomputer is by necessity quite large, as an inevita...