hackaday.com Archives - 26 October 2014, Sunday

  • Capacitive Garage Door Opener Hides Behind Your Dash

    Capacitive Garage Door Opener Hides Behind Your Dash

    hackaday.com 25 Oct '14, 11pm

    [Pyrow] wanted to upgrade his garage door opener remote. It worked just fine, but changing those tiny batteries out can be an inconvenience. Plus, the remote control was taking up valuable storage space and would always rattle around while driving. [Pyrow] decided to make use of an Om...

  • Using Kinect To Play Super Mario Bros 3 On NES Ensures Quick Death

    Using Kinect To Play Super Mario Bros 3 On NES Ensures Quick Death

    hackaday.com 25 Oct '14, 8pm

    An Arduino is used to emulate the buttons presses. The Arduino is running the Firmata sketch that allows toggling of the Arduino pins from a host computer. That host computer runs an application that [Paul] wrote himself using the Kinect V2 SDK that converts the gestures of the player...

  • [Harrison Krix's] Marriott Chariot

    [Harrison Krix's] Marriott Chariot

    hackaday.com 25 Oct '14, 5pm

    Atlanta’s Mini Maker Faire had plenty of booths to keep visitors busy, but the largest spectacle by far was the racetrack smack-dab in the middle, and you’d be hard pressed to find a more eye-catching contender than [Harrison Krix's] vehicle: the Marriott Chariot. If [Krix's] name loo...

  • A Compact Underwater Vehicle: The Nanoseeker

    A Compact Underwater Vehicle: The Nanoseeker

    hackaday.com 25 Oct '14, 2pm

    The Nanoseeker is a compact underwater vehicle in a torpedo-like form factor. [John] designed the Nanoseeker as completely enclosed vehicle: both the thruster and the control fins are all housed within the diameter of the tube. The thruster is ducted with vents on the sides and contro...

  • An SDK for the ESP8266 WiFi Chip

    An SDK for the ESP8266 WiFi Chip

    hackaday.com 25 Oct '14, 11am

    The ESP8266 is a chip that turned a lot of heads recently, stuffing a WiFi radio, TCP/IP stack, and all the required bits to get a microcontroller on the Internet into a tiny, $5 module. It’s an interesting chip, not only because it’s a UART to WiFi module, allowing nearly anything to...

  • Use a Cheap PIN Diode as a Geiger Counter

    Use a Cheap PIN Diode as a Geiger Counter

    hackaday.com 25 Oct '14, 8am

    After the Fukushima nuclear power plant disaster, radiation measurement became newly relevant for a lot of people. Geiger-Müller tubes, previously a curiosity, became simultaneously important and scarce. Opengeiger.de (English-language version here ) has complete instructions for maki...

  • FlowPaw, the Bear Paw of Electronics Education

    hackaday.com 25 Oct '14, 5am

    As far as I’m aware (and take this with a bucketload of sodium chloride), CE markings don’t _really_ apply to things like development boards. Like you say, one of the tests involved in CE marking is electrostatic protection (others include RF emissions and immunity). The test guidelin...

  • Using Excel to Watch Movies at Work

    Using Excel to Watch Movies at Work

    hackaday.com 25 Oct '14, 2am

    The Excel subreddit exploded earlier this week when redditor [AyrA_ch] shared his custom spreadsheet that allowed him to play video files on a locked-down work computer. How locked down? With no access to Windows Media Player and IE7 as the only browser (all plugins disabled, no HTML5...

  • STEAM Carnival Hacker Preview Day

    STEAM Carnival Hacker Preview Day

    hackaday.com 24 Oct '14, 11pm

    The preview day went pretty well until the evening, when unexpected power problems occurred and the site lost power for a little while. But this is why you have a preview day right? Organizer [Brent Bushnell] even commented that he should have put a BETA badge on the ticket. Thankfull...

  • Dottie the Flip Dot Clock

    hackaday.com 24 Oct '14, 8pm

    What is it that we like so much about inefficient, noisy clocks made with inappropriate technology? Answer the question for yourself by watching the video (below) that [David Henshaw] sent us of Dottie, the flip-dot clock. But besides the piece itself, we really like the progression i...

  • FTDI Screws Up, Backs Down

    hackaday.com 24 Oct '14, 2pm

    Well, the problem is that the chip is not a 1-to-1 clone, the die is completely different. They didn’t make a cheap clone of the original device as is often the case. And it so happened that they have implemented the EEPROM writes differently and FTDI exploited one difference in the u...

  • Building A Magnetic Levitating Quadcopter

    hackaday.com 24 Oct '14, 11am

    I haven’t worked out the math but it intuitively seems like the Lorenz force would induce the same kind of power draw from the motor as ideally switching a field would, and you’d be getting the same amount of electrical losses and then some to “change the field” induced by the permane...

  • HuddleLamp turns Multiple Tablets into Single Desktop

    HuddleLamp turns Multiple Tablets into Single Desktop

    hackaday.com 24 Oct '14, 8am

    Imagine you’ve got a bunch of people sitting around a table with their various mobile display devices, and you want these devices to act together. Maybe you’d like them to be peepholes into a single larger display, revealing different sections of the display as you move them around th...

  • A Complete C64 System, Emulated on an STM32

    A Complete C64 System, Emulated on an STM32

    hackaday.com 24 Oct '14, 5am

    The Commodore 64 is the worlds bestselling computer, and we’re pretty sure most programmers and engineers above a certain age owe at least some of their career to this brown/beige keyboard that’s also a computer. These engineers are all grown up now, and it’s about time for a few rema...

  • Another Internet of Things Board (But This One Has Lisp))

    Another Internet of Things Board (But This One Has Lisp))

    hackaday.com 23 Oct '14, 11pm

    Using routers as dev boards has been a long and cherished tradition in the circles we frequent, and finally design houses in China are taking notice. There have been a few ‘Internet of Things’ boards in recent months that have taken the SoC found in low-end routers, packaged the on a ...

  • I Love the Smell of Rocket Candy in the Morning

    I Love the Smell of Rocket Candy in the Morning

    hackaday.com 23 Oct '14, 8pm

    “You probably won’t want to use this blender for food after it’s been full of KNO3-based stump remover.” KNO3 is just saltpeter. Once thought to be an anti-aphrodisiac, and supposedly added to sailors’ food for that purpose. Still used for curing meat (aka “nitrates”), and is responsi...

  • Fail of the Week: Project Frosty Mug is Merely Chilly

    Fail of the Week: Project Frosty Mug is Merely Chilly

    hackaday.com 23 Oct '14, 2pm

    I’ve “hot rodded” several TEC mini fridges and coolers. Most of them are built rather poorly. The TEC contact surfaces of the sinks tend to be rather rough and often there’s far too much thermal compound applied. Smoothing the sinks with a flat file and applying just enough compound t...

  • Turning the DEFCON Badge Into a Bitcoin Miner

    hackaday.com 23 Oct '14, 11am

    The DEFCON badge this year was an impressive piece of hardware, complete with mind-bending puzzles, cap sense buttons, LEDs, and of course a Parallax Propeller. [mike] thought a chip as cool as the Propeller should be put to better use than just sitting around until next year so he tu...

  • Hackaday Retro Edition: A 286 on the Internet

    hackaday.com 23 Oct '14, 8am

    Right here. http://www.hpcfactor.com/downloads/msie/ie50/ Get it with the TCP/IP stack. If on dialup, get the dialer too. There were two different versions of Windows with the 3.11 number. Windows For Workgroups 3.11 only worked in 386 Enhanced mode, thus required at least an 80386CPU...

  • Now Let’s See The World’s Largest Arduino

    Now Let’s See The World’s Largest Arduino

    hackaday.com 23 Oct '14, 5am

    A few days ago we saw what would have been a killer Kickstarter a few years ago. It was the smallest conceivable ATtiny85 microcontroller board , with resistors, diodes, a USB connector, and eight pins for plugging into a breadboard. It’s a shame this design wasn’t around for the grea...

  • How To Reverse Engineer, Featuring the Rigol DS1054Z

    How To Reverse Engineer, Featuring the Rigol DS1054Z

    hackaday.com 23 Oct '14, 2am

    For a few years now, the Rigol DS1052E has been the unofficial My First Oscilloscope™. It’s cheap, it’s good enough for most projects, and there have been a number hacks and mods for this very popular scope to give it twice as much bandwidth and other interesting tools. The 1052E is a...

  • What’s Next on the Raspberry Pi Front

    hackaday.com 22 Oct '14, 11pm

    That seems pretty minor to be honest.. but I can totally dig the snarky(?)ness. It seems like to tell either Eben, Liz or any of their “I’m a forum moderator! Aren’t I fantastic” clan that they are wrong or misleading on something results not in a rational debate about the issue at ha...

  • Watch That Windows Update: FTDI Drivers Are Killing Fake Chips

    hackaday.com 22 Oct '14, 5pm

    No, you’re wrong. I work in a hospital. In our Intensive Care units, critical life-support equipment is run by Windows PCs via USB connections. A failed chip means the life-support stops working. Since there ARE occasional failures, we could handle one. But if the whole unit’s stuff s...

  • Cassette Tape Hack Turns Scratching into Sliding

    Cassette Tape Hack Turns Scratching into Sliding

    hackaday.com 22 Oct '14, 8am

    Making use of a cassette tape, [Jeremy] dissected samples from the reel and laid them out in horizontal strips over rails to hold their form. The pickup from the tape player has been hacked into a separate piece that glides smoothly over these rails, giving the user the ease of contro...

  • Ceci N’est Pas Une Clock

    Ceci N’est Pas Une Clock

    hackaday.com 22 Oct '14, 5am

    [Justin] tipped us about his slick custom OBD-II gauge that could easily pass for an OEM module. He was able to use the clock area of his Subaru BRZ to display a bunch of information including the oil and coolant temperatures and the battery voltage. The forum post linked above has a ...

  • Digital Data from a Cheap Power Meter

    Digital Data from a Cheap Power Meter

    hackaday.com 22 Oct '14, 2am

    Power meters like the Kill-A-Watt are great for keeping track of energy usage, and are also very hackable. The Kill-a-Watt in particular puts out analog signals proportional to current and voltage, which makes it easy to interface with a microcontroller. Although reading analog voltag...

  • Take Your Samples for a Spin with the RWXBioFuge

    Take Your Samples for a Spin with the RWXBioFuge

    hackaday.com 21 Oct '14, 11pm

    We have a confession to make: we love centrifuges. We’ve used all shapes and sizes, for spinning bags of whole blood into separate components to extracting DNA, and everything in between. Unfortunately, these lab staples are too expensive for many DIY-biologists unless they buy them u...

  • Retrotechtacular: Blue Collar, Red Nightmare

    Retrotechtacular: Blue Collar, Red Nightmare

    hackaday.com 21 Oct '14, 8pm

    “perpetrated” shows your ignorance of the death and depravity that was wrought on the Russian people by communism. It might not have the character development of Hunger Games or 50 Shades of Gray, but it tells people of the horror that killed 20,000,000+ Russian people. Stalin accompl...

  • The Hoverboard You Can Build At Home

    The Hoverboard You Can Build At Home

    hackaday.com 21 Oct '14, 4pm

    I’m really not sure about the responses there… There’s no way you can give a ‘universal’ power needed for straight levitation, because fundamentally, you don’t need any. It doesn’t cost energy to keep something 1 meter off the ground – your chair doesn’t need a battery. With magnetic ...

  • Thinkpad 701c: Reverse Engineering a Retro Processor Upgrade

    Thinkpad 701c: Reverse Engineering a Retro Processor Upgrade

    hackaday.com 21 Oct '14, 11am

    [Noq2] has given his butterfly new wings with a CPU upgrade . Few laptops are as iconic as the IBM Thinkpad 701 series and its “butterfly” TrackWrite keyboard . So iconic in fact, that a 701c is part of the permanent collection of the Museum of Modern Art in New York. Being a 1995 vin...