hackaday.com Archives - 19 April 2014, Saturday

  • BeagleBone Black + RAMPS

    BeagleBone Black + RAMPS

    hackaday.com 19 Apr '14, 8am

    The BeagleBone Black, with an impressive amount of computing power and a whole bunch of I/O, would make an impressive CNC controller, save for two shortcomings: The BBB isn’t in stock anywhere, and CNC capes are a little on the pricey side. [Marc Peltier] can’t do anything about findi...

  • Auto Roll-up Tool Storage

    Auto Roll-up Tool Storage

    hackaday.com 19 Apr '14, 5am

    This storage hack seems to draw its inspiration from field medic roll-up bags , where everything’s laid out for easy access with a quick toss. [Anred] started by taking inventory of all the items he wanted to use on a regular basis, organizing them across a sturdy fabric. Next, he mar...

  • Leak-Proof Water Blob Provides Hours of Fun

    Leak-Proof Water Blob Provides Hours of Fun

    hackaday.com 19 Apr '14, 2am

    With the warm weather slowly creeping back it’s time to think of warm summer days, and with that comes this rather interesting leak-proof water… blob? [Leisha] over at Homemade Toast has come up with a super inexpensive way to make a water blob – or a giant outdoor waterbed? It certai...

  • PenguinBot Follows Light, Goes Screech in the Night

    PenguinBot Follows Light, Goes Screech in the Night

    hackaday.com 18 Apr '14, 11pm

    He started by pulling out most of the original electronics. Two dollar store toy trains gave their lives and their motors to replace the penguin’s original drive system. An Arduino Pro Mini became PenguinBot’s brain. Sensors consisted of two light sensing CdS cells, an AdaFruit sound ...

  • Low-Power Orientation Tracker and an Optimized Math Library for the MSP430: Orientation track... #TeamFollowBack

    Low-Power Orientation Tracker and an Optimized Math Library for the MSP430

    hackaday.com 18 Apr '14, 8pm

    CircuitCo’s Educational BoosterPack , the orientation tracker is very simple to put together. It can also be made wireless using any of the wireless BoosterPacks with a Fuel Tank BoosterPack , or by using the BLE Booster Pack with a built in Lithium Battery circuitry. TI provide all t...

  • DIY Gas Can Speakers Blast Your Tunes: Have you ever wanted to build your own speakers, but w... #TeamFollowBack

    DIY Gas Can Speakers Blast Your Tunes

    hackaday.com 18 Apr '14, 5pm

    While using gas cans as speaker housings will not result in the best audiophile quality sound or be the cheapest option out there, it sure looks awesome, and is a great way to get started with building your own speakers. After testing out the speakers and electronics, holes in the gas...

  • We’re Not Joking Around; Something BIG is Coming

    We’re Not Joking Around; Something BIG is Coming

    hackaday.com 18 Apr '14, 2pm

    We’re Not Joking Around; Something BIG is Coming April 18, 2014 By Mike Szczys 15 Comments Countdown timer, a special presentation on the first of this month, and now there’s been some weekly mystery posts . What are we playing at? We’re not playing. This is real. That timer is now be...

  • Sci-Fi Contest Roundup: No Tea

    Sci-Fi Contest Roundup: No Tea

    hackaday.com 18 Apr '14, 11am

    In case you haven’t heard, we’re running a contest on Hackaday Projects for the best Sci-Fi build. We’re a little under two weeks until the deadline for the contest and so far there are a lot of great entries (and lots of great prizes still up for grabs). If there’s one thing this con...

  • Sniffing Vending Machine Buses

    Sniffing Vending Machine Buses

    hackaday.com 18 Apr '14, 8am

    We’ve talked about a variety of protocols and how to deal with them in the past. Today, [Dan] is working on sniffing vending machine Multidrop Bus . The Multidrop Bus (MDB) protocol is a standard used in vending machines to connect devices such as currency collectors to the host contr...

  • Raspberry Pi Remote Audio Link

    Raspberry Pi Remote Audio Link

    hackaday.com 18 Apr '14, 5am

    In broadcast, lots of people are still using dedicated analog lines to connect remote sites. These operate like old telephone systems: you call up the operator and request to be patched through to a specific site. They’re also rather expensive. For a hospital radio station, [Marc] wan...

  • Interactive Gloves Turn Gestures into Music

    Interactive Gloves Turn Gestures into Music

    hackaday.com 18 Apr '14, 2am

    [Imogen Heap] is a UK-based musician who is trying to change the way we think about making music. She’s been working on a pair of gloves called the Mi.Mu , and they’re getting close to production. In the included interview she explains that while computers and technology have brought ...

  • The Persistence of Jumping Rope

    The Persistence of Jumping Rope

    hackaday.com 17 Apr '14, 11pm

    [Antonio Ospite] recently took up jump rope to increase his cardio, and also being a hacker decided to have some extra fun with it. He’s created the JMP-Rope — the Programmable Jump Rope. He’s using the same principle as a normal POV (Persistence of Vision) display , but with a cool t...

  • New post: Interactive 3D Projection is Foggy At Best

    Interactive 3D Projection is Foggy At Best

    hackaday.com 17 Apr '14, 8pm

    It’s a project by Bristol Interaction and Graphics group of the University of Bristol, and it’s an interesting twist on 3D projection. They’ve created what they call the MisTable which features a smoke machine, “smoke screens”, and three projectors. What it results in is an interactiv...

  • Using Non-Crappy Software With The Da Vinci Printer

    Using Non-Crappy Software With The Da Vinci Printer

    hackaday.com 17 Apr '14, 5pm

    The Da Vinci printer from XYZprinting is turning out to be one of the best buys in the world of cheap, consumer printers. Sure, it uses chipped filament, but that’s an easy fix for anyone who knows what a .hex file is. And yes, the Da Vinci host software is a mess of proprietary garba...

  • Measuring Frequency Response with an L-SDR Dongle and a Diode

    Measuring Frequency Response with an RTL-SDR Dongle and a Diode

    hackaday.com 17 Apr '14, 2pm

    [Hans] wanted to see the frequency response of a bandpass filter but didn’t have a lot of test equipment. Using an RTL-SDR dongle, some software and a quickly made noise generator, he still managed to get a rough idea of the filter’s characteristics . How did he do it? He ‘simply’ mea...

  • Lego Robot Plays Games For You As You Sleep

    Lego Robot Plays Games For You As You Sleep

    hackaday.com 17 Apr '14, 11am

    [Uli Kilian] — best known for solving 100 Rubik’s cubes during the 2011 London Marathon — got addicted to a free iPad game called Jurassic Park builder. Being the efficient man he is, he soon realized the game could be automated — after all, you just have to tap on dinosaurs every few...

  • Awww Shoot! My Spool Doesn’t Fit My Holder

    Awww Shoot! My Spool Doesn’t Fit My Holder

    hackaday.com 17 Apr '14, 8am

    [Ben] took a different approach to the same problem. His design holds the spool on its side making the spool width have no affect on the holders’ functionality. The parts for this spool holder are recycled from an old computer CD drive. If we’d have to suggest anything, it would be to...

  • New post: Hackaday Retro Edition: Parallel Port Ethernet

    Hackaday Retro Edition: Parallel Port Ethernet

    hackaday.com 17 Apr '14, 5am

    The next one isn’t exactly vintage, but it does carry the spirit of antiquated hardware onto the web. [Valentin] is using a FleaFPGA and a 186 over at OpenCores . The FPGA board gives him VGA output, an SD card, A PS/2 keyboard, but no options for networking. That’s no problem for [Va...

  • Kyub MIDI Keyboard Puts a Piano in Your Pocket

    Kyub MIDI Keyboard Puts a Piano in Your Pocket

    hackaday.com 17 Apr '14, 2am

    [Keith Baxter] loves making electronic instruments. His latest vision has come to life as Kyub, an open-source MIDI keyboard . [Keith] has previously graced our site and cracked Popular Science with his servoelectric guitar . [Keith] wanted to make a completely open source instrument ...

  • Wearable flames with fur and LED strips

    Wearable flames with fur and LED strips

    hackaday.com 16 Apr '14, 11pm

    [Finchronicity] over on Hackaday Projects has made a pretty awesome furry LED Vest to keep him warm and well lit at this year’s Burning Man. He is using a Teensy 3.0 that drives strips of 470 WS2811 LEDs. The vertically aligned strips run on a continuous sequence which reaches up to 3...

  • Building the Internet of “Thing” at FTF2014

    Building the Internet of “Thing” at FTF2014

    hackaday.com 16 Apr '14, 5pm

    It’s official: all the hype around IoT is starting to get a bit annoying. Not because there’s anything wrong with building Internet-connected devices, but because so many people are trying to jump on the bandwagon with the same old “Future: brought to you by Megacorp #07″-mindset. Rec...

  • Building a Mesh Networked Conference Badge

    hackaday.com 16 Apr '14, 2pm

    That’s what I meant by “conceptual”. I know your badges worked and did so very well too. I was just wondering if the PC screen was showing TRUE geographic location in the building or not. You answered my question – they are not. Have you thought of this idea?: I was reading an article...

  • Homemade Gravity Light Doesn’t Last Long but Proves the Concept!

    Homemade Gravity Light Doesn’t Last Long but Proves the Concept!

    hackaday.com 16 Apr '14, 11am

    OK how about eliminating the water weight gravity feed and chain and move to an alternative method? Namely elastic potential energy. Keep the same rig as before, however, add a large elastic band to the center hub of the bicycle wheel (like a rubber sheet from a physical body workout ...

  • Inkjet Transfers to Wood

    Inkjet Transfers to Wood

    hackaday.com 16 Apr '14, 8am

    You can’t feed a piece of wood through a stock inkjet printer, and if you could it’s likely the nature of the material would result in less than optimal prints. But [Steve Ramsey] has a tutorial on inkjet transfers to wood over on his YouTube Channel which is a simple two-step method ...

  • The HellZXchreiber

    The HellZXchreiber

    hackaday.com 16 Apr '14, 5am

    Hellschreiber – German for ‘light pen’ – was developed in the 20s as a way to transmit text in a way that was much more robust than the teletypes of the time. These devices were used to great effect by the Germans in WWII, and later became popular with wire services and was used until...

  • Frozen Instruments Played at Swedish Music Festival

    Frozen Instruments Played at Swedish Music Festival

    hackaday.com 16 Apr '14, 2am

    [Tim Linhart] wanted to do something different for this Swedish music festival — so he decided to carve all the instruments by hand, out of ice. The festival consists of seven bands playing very different musical styles, with over 40 concerts occurring during the festival. [Tim Linhar...

  • The Hacklet #1

    The Hacklet #1

    hackaday.com 16 Apr '14, 1am

    With the launch of hackaday.io, our project hosting site, we’ve seen quite a bit of interesting hacks flowing in. While we feature some of our favorite projects on the blog, we’ve decided it’s time to start a regular recap of what’s going on in the Hackaday Projects community. We call...

  • A 3D Printed Cryptex

    hackaday.com 15 Apr '14, 11pm

    When I read that book and got to the part about the glass vial of vinegar and the message printed on papyrus, which the vinegar would supposedly destroy… I was thinking mount the thing in a jig at an angle then carefully drill up from underneath it into the glass vial while having a s...

  • Developed on Hackaday: Olivier’s Design Rundown

    hackaday.com 15 Apr '14, 9pm

    the main point of a removable master key storage is to always have it with you. If you have to get up and go the loo you can simply snatch out the card and take it with you. (In a corporate setting it’s not uncommon to enforce this, by making the secret storing smart card also act as ...

  • Retrotechtacular: The Cryotron Computer

    Retrotechtacular: The Cryotron Computer

    hackaday.com 15 Apr '14, 5pm

    The name comes from the low temperature bath necessary to make the switches work properly. Miniaturization was the key as it always is; the example above is a relatively small example of the wire-wound version of the Cryotron, but the end goal was a process very familiar to us today. ...