hackaday.com Archives - 21 October 2014, Tuesday

  • What Is This, A Microcontroller Board For Ants?

    hackaday.com 21 Oct '14, 8am

    You youngins probably don’t remember this, but a few years ago there was an arms race on Kickstarter to create the smallest Arduino-compatible microcontroller board. Since then, a few people have realized they can make more money on Kickstarter through fraud or potato salad, and the r...

  • Controlling a Flip-Disc Display Using Android

    Controlling a Flip-Disc Display Using Android

    hackaday.com 21 Oct '14, 5am

    There’s just something about electro-mechanical displays that enthralls most people when they see them; and while you’ll be hard pressed to find a split-flap display for cheap, you can still easily buy flip-disc displays! That’s what [Scott] did, and he’s been having a blast messing a...

  • Solid State Tesla Coil Plays Music

    Solid State Tesla Coil Plays Music

    hackaday.com 21 Oct '14, 2am

    If you’ve ever wanted to build a Tesla coil but found them to be prohibitively expensive and/or complicated, look no further! [Richard] has built a solid-state Tesla coil that has a minimum of parts and is relatively easy to build as well. This Tesla coil is built around an air-core t...

  • Your New Winter Hat Should Express Your Brain Waves Like a Neon Sign… Just Saying

    Your New Winter Hat Should Express Your Brain Waves Like a Neon Sign… Just Saying

    hackaday.com 20 Oct '14, 11pm

    We’ve seen a few cool hacks for mainstream commercial EEG headsets, but these are all a tad spendy for leisurely play or experimentation. The illumino project by [io] however, has a relatively short and affordable list of materials for creating your own EEG sensor. It’s even built int...

  • The Internet of Things Chip Gets a New Spectrum

    hackaday.com 20 Oct '14, 8pm

    Last year we learned about Weightless , an Internet of Things chip that solves all the problems of current wireless solutions. It’s low power and has a 10-year battery life (one AA cell), the hardware should cost around $2 per module, and the range of the Weightless devices range from...

  • Think Before You Measure – Old Test Gear and Why It Is Awesome

    Think Before You Measure – Old Test Gear and Why It Is Awesome

    hackaday.com 20 Oct '14, 2pm

    Think before you measure – some guidelines for using old gear Trust nothing! When using old test gear of any type you must tailor your measurement procedures so that you are always verifying. When your circuit is not behaving as expected, the first thing you should do is verify power ...

  • A Single Pixel, Color Digital Camera

    A Single Pixel, Color Digital Camera

    hackaday.com 20 Oct '14, 11am

    After getting all the pixel data to his laptop, [Ben] plotted the raw data. The first few pictures were of a point source of light – a lamp in his workspace. This resulted in exactly what he expected, a wave-like line on an otherwise blank field. The resulting transformation kinda loo...

  • Electric Bubblegum Board

    Electric Bubblegum Board

    hackaday.com 20 Oct '14, 8am

    The Mini Maker Faire in Atlanta was packed with exciting builds and devices, but [Andrew's] Electric Bubblegum Boards stood out from the rest, winning the Editor’s Choice Award. His boards first emerged on Endless Sphere earlier this summer, with the goal of hitting all the usual e-sk...

  • High Altitude Balloon Keeps Going

    High Altitude Balloon Keeps Going

    hackaday.com 20 Oct '14, 5am

    Here’s a post from the AMSAT-UK high altitude balloon blog . It’s a great story about a balloon cruising at about 12km above the Earth completing its sixth circumnavigation of the planet . That post is from October 4th, and two weeks later the balloon is still going strong. Right now ...

  • Shocking Idea: Prank Stun Baton

    Shocking Idea: Prank Stun Baton

    hackaday.com 20 Oct '14, 2am

    [Christopher] has put together a Prank Stun Baton to annoy his friends. It delivers a slight shock to the person on the business end of the device. Oddly, it’s powered solely by static electricity, there is no battery here and the resulting injury is no worse than touching a door knob...

  • Hackaday Links: October 19, 2014

    hackaday.com 19 Oct '14, 11pm

    Introducing the Hayes Smartmodem 1200 . The era of the single station microcomputer…. is over. The Hayes Smartmodem offers advanced features like auto answer and auto dial. Now if we could only find an ‘RS-232 Computer.’ Have a 3D printer and an old router? How about controlling your ...

  • Using the Wrong Screw: A Painful Lesson in iPhone Repair

    Using the Wrong Screw: A Painful Lesson in iPhone Repair

    hackaday.com 19 Oct '14, 8pm

    If you’ve ever had to repair an iPhone for a friend, you’ll know they have a ridiculous number of screws. Most companies standardize screws in their products, but since Apple doesn’t expect you to fix a phone yourself… they may have let this one slide. You see, each of these screws is...

  • Robot Arm You Can Build At Home

    Robot Arm You Can Build At Home

    hackaday.com 19 Oct '14, 5pm

    [jjshortcut] has created an easy to make robot arm that has 6 degrees of freedom. There is not much to it, the frame is made out of 4mm thick hardboard, hobby servos provide the power and a handful of hardware holds it together. The frame has been successfully cut out on both a laser ...

  • Delving Into the Design and Manufacture of a Keyboard

    Delving Into the Design and Manufacture of a Keyboard

    hackaday.com 19 Oct '14, 2pm

    A while back [Dave] decided he wanted to build his own keyboard. [Dave] has no experience in design, or dealing with manufacturing companies, or even sourcing materials – he just wanted to see if he could do it. That’s the beauty of the DIY world – most of the time, you can do it , yo...

  • Playing Doom (Poorly) on a VoCore

    Playing Doom (Poorly) on a VoCore

    hackaday.com 19 Oct '14, 11am

    Last May brought the unastonishing news that companies were taking the Systems on Chip found in $20 wireless routers and making dev boards out of them. The first of these is the VoCore, an Indiegogo campaign for a 360MHz CPU with 8MB of Flash and 32MB or RAM packaged in a square inch ...

  • DIY Vacuum Former On The Cheap

    DIY Vacuum Former On The Cheap

    hackaday.com 19 Oct '14, 8am

    Vacuum Forming is a process used to mold plastic into a desired shape. A thin sheet of plastic is heated to a soft state and then air pressure is used to press the plastic down around or into a mold. Vacuum forming can be used to make a variety of items, anything from product packagin...

  • Replacing the Lead in a Motorcycle Battery with Supercaps

    Replacing the Lead in a Motorcycle Battery with Supercaps

    hackaday.com 19 Oct '14, 5am

    [Raphael] has a motorcycle he’s constantly working on, and for him that means replacing the battery occasionally. Tired of the lead-acid batteries that have been used for 100 years now, he took a look at some of the alternatives, namely lithium and the much cooler supercapacitor optio...

  • The Network of 1-Wire Devices

    hackaday.com 19 Oct '14, 2am

    [jimmayhugh] is a homebrewer and has multiple fermentation chambers and storage coolers scattered around his home. Lucky him. Nevertheless, multiple ways of making and storing beer requires some way to tell the temperature of his coolers and fermenters. There aren’t many temperature c...

  • This Analog Cambot Plays Outside the Lines

    This Analog Cambot Plays Outside the Lines

    hackaday.com 18 Oct '14, 11pm

    There are quite a few flavors of line following robot. No matter how they’re made, most are built for speed and accuracy. The Cambot by [Jorge Fernandez] however makes use of a traditional video camera to read visual input instead of the reflective sensors we’re used to seeing in thes...

  • The Economics of Fuzz Testing with the Intel Edison

    The Economics of Fuzz Testing with the Intel Edison

    hackaday.com 18 Oct '14, 8pm

    The Intel Edison is an incredibly small and cheap x86 computing platform, and with that comes the obvious applications for robotics and wearable computing. [mz] had another idea: what if the Edison could do work that is usually done by workstations? Would it make economic sense to buy...

  • Don’t You Just Love Comic Sans?

    Don’t You Just Love Comic Sans?

    hackaday.com 18 Oct '14, 5pm

    Trick question! Of course you do, everyone loves Comic Sans! It’s only like the best font in the history of the internet! Why would you ever use anything else? Oh! Is it because you feel like writing your novella on a computer is cheating? You wish you could use Comic Sans on your cla...

  • This Message Will Self-Destruct in 5 Seconds

    This Message Will Self-Destruct in 5 Seconds

    hackaday.com 18 Oct '14, 2pm

    Good morning, Mr. Hunt. Your mission, should you choose to accept it… blah blah blah… This post will self-destruct in five seconds. This is [Diego Trujillo Pisanty's] latest project dubbed “This Tape Will Self-Destruct “, and it’s a fully functional small scale printer, whose media ca...

  • Creating a 2D Film with 3D Printed Frames

    Creating a 2D Film with 3D Printed Frames

    hackaday.com 18 Oct '14, 11am

    [Julien’s] intricately built projection reel in itself is an impressive mechanical feat, arguably out-staging the image it exists to produce on the wall of the gallery space. The eighty-five individual frames that create the short clip of a man digging a hole in the ground, consist of...

  • Simple Photo Flash Trigger for Water Balloon Photography - #arduino

    Simple Photo Flash Trigger for Water Balloon Photography

    hackaday.com 18 Oct '14, 10am

    There have been countless projects to make custom photo flash trigger circuits. Usually the circuits react to sound, triggering the camera flash at the moment a certain sound is triggered. That type of trigger can be used to detect the popping of a balloon or shattering of glass. Othe...

  • Reverse Engineering a Bathroom Scale for Automated Weight Tracking

    Reverse Engineering a Bathroom Scale for Automated Weight Tracking

    hackaday.com 18 Oct '14, 8am

    [Darell] recently purchased a fancy new bathroom scale. Unlike an average bathroom scale, this one came with a wireless digital display. The user stands on the scale and the base unit transmits the weight measurement to the display using infrared signals. The idea is that you can plac...

  • 3D Printing Goes Hand in Hand with Iron Man Inspired Prosthetic

    3D Printing Goes Hand in Hand with Iron Man Inspired Prosthetic

    hackaday.com 18 Oct '14, 5am

    It’s exciting how much 3D printing has enabled us to produce pretty much any shape for any purpose on the fly. Among the most thoughtful uses for the technology that we’ve seen are the many functioning and often beautiful prosthetics that not only succeed in restoring the use of a lim...

  • Open-Source Water Quality Tester

    Open-Source Water Quality Tester

    hackaday.com 18 Oct '14, 2am

    Contaminated water is a huge problem in many third-world countries. Impure water leads to many serious health problems, especially in children. Installing a water purification system seems like a simple solution to this problem, but choosing the right purification system depends on th...

  • Guitar Pedal Hack via Manufacturer’s Shortcut

    Guitar Pedal Hack via Manufacturer’s Shortcut

    hackaday.com 17 Oct '14, 11pm

    There seems to be no shortage of manufacturers that cut costs by using similar components across a wide range of products. This isn’t necessarily a bad thing though, since it makes it easier for someone with some know-how to quickly open up the product and figure out how to get more u...

  • Anonabox: How To Fail Horribly at Kickstarter

    hackaday.com 17 Oct '14, 8pm

    I don’t know if my point really came across correctly but let me illustrate the point by a story from Defcon 2014. This one guy was hired by a corporation to try to infiltrate their facilities. The main floor and all major doors were monitored, guarded, IDs checked etc. But in the bac...

  • Introducing the F*Watch, a Fully Open Electronic Watch

    Introducing the F*Watch, a Fully Open Electronic Watch

    hackaday.com 17 Oct '14, 2pm

    As one of their colleagues was retiring, several CERN engineers got together after hours during 4 months to develop his gift: a fully open electronic watch . It is called the F*Watch and is packed with sensors: GPS, barometer, compass, accelerometer and light sensor. The microcontroll...