hackaday.com Archives - 16 December 2017, Saturday

  • Coin cell powered sea turtle research

    Coin cell powered sea turtle research | Hackaday

    hackaday.com 16 Dec '17, 12am

    Hacking and tinkering are always fun and games, but one just has to appreciate when all efforts are additionally aimed towards doing something good. [Nikos] sets an example by combining his interest in technology with his passion for wildlife conservation by creating a low cost and ul...

  • A Robot Arm for Virtual Beer Pong

    A Robot Arm for Virtual Beer Pong | Hackaday

    hackaday.com 15 Dec '17, 9pm

    Leave it to engineering students to redefine partying. [Hyun], [Justin], and [Daniel] have done exactly that for their final project by building a virtually-controlled robotic arm that plays beer pong . There are two main parts to this build: a sleeve worn by the user, and the robotic...

  • Brute Forcing Passwords with a 3D Printer

    Brute Forcing Passwords with a 3D Printer | Hackaday

    hackaday.com 15 Dec '17, 7pm

    Many of us use a 4 digit pin code to lock our phones. [David Randolph] over at Hak5 has come up a simple way to use a 3D printer to brute force these passwords . Just about every 3D printer out there speaks the same language, G-code. The same language used in CAD and CNC machines for ...

  • Thermistors and 3D Printing

    Thermistors and 3D Printing | Hackaday

    hackaday.com 15 Dec '17, 6pm

    I always find it interesting that 3D printers — at least the kind most of us have — are mostly open-loop devices. You tell the head to move four millimeters in the X direction and you assume that the stepper motors will make it so. Because of the mechanics, you can calculate that four...

  • Design a Microcontroller With Security In Mind

    Design a Microcontroller With Security In Mind | Hackaday

    hackaday.com 15 Dec '17, 4pm

    There are many parts to building a secure networked device, and the entire industry is still learning how to do it right. Resources are especially constrained for low-cost microcontroller devices. Would it be easier to build more secure devices if microcontrollers had security hardwar...

  • Hardware Heroes: Isambard Kingdom Brunel

    Hardware Heroes: Isambard Kingdom Brunel | Hackaday

    hackaday.com 15 Dec '17, 3pm

    Brunel’s memorial on the Embankment. Going back to our journey across London, there are many different possible routes over the London Transport network from the tunnel museum at Rotherhithe to the Great Western Railway terminus at Paddington, but we took one of the less obvious ones ...

  • Modernizing Puerto Rico’s Grid https://t.co/ZxrnqNcEUz

    Modernizing Puerto Rico’s Grid | Hackaday

    hackaday.com 15 Dec '17, 12pm

    After two massive hurricanes impacted Puerto Rico three months ago, the island was left with extensive damage to its electrical infrastructure. Part of the problem was that the infrastructure was woefully inadequate to withstand a hurricane impact at all. It is possible to harden buil...

  • Retractable Console Allows Wheelchair User to Get up Close and Personal

    Retractable Console Allows Wheelchair User to Get up Close and Personal | Hackaday

    hackaday.com 15 Dec '17, 9am

    [Rhonda] has multiple sclerosis (MS), a disease that limits her ability to walk and use her arms. She and the other residents of The Boston Home, an extended care facility for people with MS and other neuromuscular diseases, rely on their wheelchairs for mobility. [Rhonda]’s chair com...

  • Dumb Coffee Grinder Gets Smarter with Time | Hackaday

    hackaday.com 15 Dec '17, 6am

    [Forklift] has a Rancilio Rocky, a prosumer-level coffee grinder that’s been a popular mainstay for the last few decades. It’s a simple machine with a direct-drive motor. Rocky has one job, and it will do that job in one of 55 slightly different ways as long as someone is pushing the ...

  • Putting Wind in VR by Watching the Audio Signal

    Putting Wind in VR by Watching the Audio Signal | Hackaday

    hackaday.com 15 Dec '17, 3am

    A simple way to integrate physical feedback into a virtual experience is to use a fan to blow air at the user. This idea has been done before, and the fans are usually the easy part. [Paige Pruitt] and [Sean Spielberg] put a twist on things in their (now-canceled) Kickstarter campaign...

  • Reverse Engineering the Nintendo Wavebird

    Reverse Engineering the Nintendo Wavebird | Hackaday

    hackaday.com 15 Dec '17, 12am

    Readers who were firmly on Team Nintendo in the early 2000’s or so can tell you that there was no accessory cooler for the Nintendo GameCube than the WaveBird. Previous attempts at wireless game controllers had generally either been sketchy third-party accessories or based around IR, ...

  • Hacking an AUX Port for a Google Home Mini | Hackaday

    hackaday.com 14 Dec '17, 9pm

    Even if you don’t want to add an AUX audio output port to your Google Home Mini, you’ll still want to see a pair of videos from [SnekTek] . After all, you’ll eventually want to open it up, and putting it over some boiling water might not have been your first idea. You can see both vid...

  • This Coin Cell Can Move That Train!

    This Coin Cell Can Move That Train! | Hackaday

    hackaday.com 14 Dec '17, 7pm

    A coin cell on its own will not move a model locomotive designed to run on twelve volts. So [Mark] used a boost converter to turn three volts into twelve. The coin cell has a high internal resistance, though, so first the coin cell was discharged into a couple of supercapacitors which...

  • Using Gmail with OAUTH2 in Linux and on an ESP8266

    Using Gmail with OAUTH2 in Linux and on an ESP8266 | Hackaday

    hackaday.com 14 Dec '17, 6pm

    One of the tasks I dread is configuring a web server to send email correctly via Gmail. The simplest way of sending emails is SMTP, and there are a number of scripts out there that provide a simple method to send mail that way with a minimum of configuration. There’s even PHP mail() ,...

  • Friday Hack Chat: Eagle One Year Later

    Friday Hack Chat: Eagle One Year Later | Hackaday

    hackaday.com 14 Dec '17, 5pm

    Way back in June of 2016, Autodesk acquired Cadsoft, and with it EagleCAD, the popular PCB design software. There were plans for some features that should have been in Eagle two decades ago, and right now Autodesk is rolling out an impressive list of features that include UX improveme...

  • The Zombie Rises Again: Drone Registration Is Back | Hackaday

    hackaday.com 14 Dec '17, 4pm

    It’s a trope of horror movies that demonic foes always return. No sooner has the bad guy been dissolved in a withering hail of holy water in the denoeument of the first movie, than some foolish child in a white dress at the start of the next is queuing up to re-animate it with a carel...

  • Truly Terrible Dimensioned Drawings

    Truly Terrible Dimensioned Drawings | Hackaday

    hackaday.com 14 Dec '17, 3pm

    First, take a look at the photograph of the part. It’s what you would expect for a DIN 5 connector. There are five pins, and an additional grounding pin for the shield of the connector, just like every other DIN 5 connector on the planet. Take a look at the drawing. It’s actually not ...

  • ADSL Robustness Verified By Running Over Wet String

    ADSL Robustness Verified By Running Over Wet String | Hackaday

    hackaday.com 14 Dec '17, 12pm

    A core part of the hacker mentality is the desire to test limits: trying out ideas to see if something interesting, informative, and/or entertaining comes out of it. Some employees of Andrews & Arnold (a UK network provider) applied this mentality towards connecting their ADSL test eq...

  • CNC’d MacBook Breathes Easy https://t.co/Q2AMPiAdL5

    CNC’d MacBook Breathes Easy | Hackaday

    hackaday.com 14 Dec '17, 9am

    Sick of his 2011 Macbook kicking its fans into overdrive every time the temperatures started to climb, [Arthur] decided to go with the nuclear option and cut some ventilation holes into the bottom of the machine’s aluminum case. But it just so happens that he had the patience and prop...

  • Building A Drone That (Almost) Follows You Home

    Building A Drone That (Almost) Follows You Home | Hackaday

    hackaday.com 14 Dec '17, 6am

    There’s a great deal of research happening around the topic of autonomous vehicles of all creeds and colours. [Ryan] decided this was an interesting field, and took on an autonomous drone as his final project at Cornell University. The main idea was to create a drone that could autono...

  • Will Hack For Espresso

    Will Hack For Espresso | Hackaday

    hackaday.com 14 Dec '17, 3am

    [Avidan Ross] has an unyielding passion for coffee. Brewing a proper espresso is more than measuring fluid ounces, and to that end, his office’s current espresso machine was not making the cut. What’s a maker to do but enlist his skills to brew some high-tech coffee . For a proper esp...

  • Guitar Game Plays with Enhanced Realism

    Guitar Game Plays with Enhanced Realism | Hackaday

    hackaday.com 13 Dec '17, 9pm

    There’s a lot more to learning how to play the guitar than just playing the right notes at the right time and in the right order. To produce any sound at all requires learning how to do completely different things with your hands simultaneously, unless maybe you’re a direct descendant...

  • Extraterrestrial Autonomous Lander Systems to Touch Down on Mars

    Extraterrestrial Autonomous Lander Systems to Touch Down on Mars | Hackaday

    hackaday.com 13 Dec '17, 7pm

    The future of humans is on Mars. Between SpaceX, Boeing, NASA, and every other national space program, we’re going to Mars. With this comes a problem: flying to Mars is relatively easy, but landing a large payload on the surface of another planet is orders of magnitude more difficult....

  • Statistics and Hacking: A Stout Little Distribution

    Statistics and Hacking: A Stout Little Distribution | Hackaday

    hackaday.com 13 Dec '17, 6pm

    Previously, we discussed how to apply the most basic hypothesis test: the z-test . It requires a relatively large sample size, and might be appreciated less by hackers searching for truth on a tight budget of time and money. As an alternative, we briefly mentioned the t-test. The basi...

  • The Tiniest Of 555 Pianos | Hackaday

    hackaday.com 13 Dec '17, 4pm

    The 555 timer is one of that special club of integrated circuits that has achieved silicon immortality. Despite its advanced age and having had its functionality replicated and superceded in almost every way, it remains in production and is still extremely popular because it’s simply ...

  • Accident Forgiveness Comes to GPLv2

    Accident Forgiveness Comes to GPLv2 | Hackaday

    hackaday.com 13 Dec '17, 3pm

    Years ago, while the GPLv3 was still being drafted, I got a chance to attend a presentation by Richard Stallman. He did his whole routine as St IGNUcius , and then at the end said he would be answering questions in a separate room off to the side. While the more causal nerds shuffled ...

  • Bluetooth Gun Safe Cracked By Researchers

    Bluetooth Gun Safe Cracked By Researchers | Hackaday

    hackaday.com 13 Dec '17, 12pm

    Believe it or not, there are quite a few people out there who have purchased gun safes that can be remotely unlocked by Bluetooth. Now we can understand why somebody might think this was a good idea: the convenience of being able to hit a button on your phone and have your weapon avai...

  • Generate Random Numbers The Hard Way

    Generate Random Numbers The Hard Way | Hackaday

    hackaday.com 13 Dec '17, 9am

    Your job is to create a random number generator. Your device starts with a speaker and a membrane. On this membrane will sit a handful of small, marble-size copper balls. An audio source feeds the speaker and causes the balls to bounce to and fro. If a ball bounces high enough, it wil...

  • Connecting Cherry MX Key Switches To LEGO Just Got Easier

    Connecting Cherry MX Key Switches To LEGO Just Got Easier | Hackaday

    hackaday.com 13 Dec '17, 3am

    Here on Hackaday, we like keyboard hacks. Given how much time we all spend pounding away on them, they’re natural hacks to come up with. If you’re pulling the circuitry from an existing keyboard then chances are the keys are pressed either by pushing down on rubber domes (AKA the memb...

  • Car Lights for Reflow Heat Source | Hackaday

    hackaday.com 13 Dec '17, 12am

    If you only have a car and you need to unsolder some tricky surface mount components: what would you do? If you’re Kasyan TV, you’d remove your car’s halogen lights and get to town. That’s right: car lights for reflow. When the friend of the host of Kasyan TV needed to remove some roa...