hackaday.com Archives - 22 September 2014, Monday

  • A Water Powered Flashlight?

    A Water Powered Flashlight?

    hackaday.com 22 Sep '14, 8am

    That’s not water powered. No energy is extracted from the water, it’s purely used as an ion transport like every other electrochemical cell out there. The video names this properly – it’s not water powered, it’s water *activated*. Water activated batteries are stored dry and sealed, a...

  • A Li-ion Battery Charging Guide

    A Li-ion Battery Charging Guide

    hackaday.com 22 Sep '14, 2am

    Although [pinomelean's] Lithium-ion battery guide sounds like the topic is a bit specific, you’ll find a number of rechargeable battery basics discussed at length. Don’t know what a C-rate is ? Pfffft. Roll up those sleeves and let’s dive into some theory. As if you needed a reminder,...

  • Hackaday Links: September 21, 2014

    hackaday.com 21 Sep '14, 11pm

    this video biography of the rLab hackerspace . It shows off the space and its members but also tells the story of a tight-knit community. We enjoyed hearing that almost everything in the space is salvaged and repaired; a great way to acquire equipment on a tight budget while also buil...

  • Ask Hackaday: How Would You Build a Clock Clock?

    Ask Hackaday: How Would You Build a Clock Clock?

    hackaday.com 21 Sep '14, 8pm

    Since we’re covering this once again we thought it would be fun to ask: how would you go about building your own? There are several challenges that come to mind. First, notice both hands of the analog clocks appear to be exactly the same (there is no short hour hand). Driving the coil...

  • Flite Test at NYC Maker Faire

    hackaday.com 21 Sep '14, 5pm

    NYC Maker Faire may be a no fly zone this year, but that didn’t dampen the spirits of the Flite Test Crew. We met with Flite Test outside their tent in the R/C and drone area of Maker Faire. [Josh Bixler and Alex Zvada] are two of the hosts of the popular YouTube channel. [Josh] is al...

  • Component Video Input Hack is a Master Hack for CRT Televisions

    RGB Video Input Hack is a Master Hack for CRT Televisions

    hackaday.com 21 Sep '14, 2pm

    What’s shown on the screen above is about half-way through the process of hacking RGB video into a CRT television that’s not supposed to have it. The lettering is acting a bit like a layer mask, showing bits of the Super Mario Bros. start screen which is being injected from an origina...

  • THP Semifinalist: A Haptic Vest With 48 Vibration Motors

    THP Semifinalist: A Haptic Vest With 48 Vibration Motors

    hackaday.com 21 Sep '14, 11am

    For his entry to The Hackady Prize, [Sean] is building a haptic vest for gamers and the visually impaired . It’s exactly what you think it is: a vest with proximity sensors and motors that wrap around the wearer, providing haptic feedback of nearby obstacles. Actually building a vest ...

  • A Professional Spot Welder Made out of a Microwave Transformer

    A Professional Spot Welder Made out of a Microwave Transformer

    hackaday.com 21 Sep '14, 8am

    Spot welders are one of the very few pieces of metal working equipment that are actually very much cheaper to build yourself than to buy commercially. In fact, between salvaging a transformer out of an old microwave and buying some of the other components, it’s doable for under $100US...

  • Open Source Hackable Robot

    Open Source Hackable Robot

    hackaday.com 21 Sep '14, 5am

    The world of robots is an interesting place, and it’s an even better place for children to get started in electronics. To that end, [Richard Albritton] has created a low-cost, open source robotics platform called the Hack-E-Bot specifically tailored to make it as easy as possible to g...

  • THP Semifinalist: Cheap Satellite Transponder

    THP Semifinalist: Cheap Satellite Transponder

    hackaday.com 21 Sep '14, 2am

    The uplink frequency for this satellite will be in the neighborhood of 2.4 GHz, and [2FTG] needed a way to deal with the out of band interference in this part of the spectrum. The easy and cheap way to do this is with filters made for the WiFi band. Instead, [2FTG] had a few cavity fi...

  • Low-Level Computing with Entry-Level Difficulty: DUO Light

    Low-Level Computing with Entry-Level Difficulty: DUO Light

    hackaday.com 20 Sep '14, 11pm

    The hardware can’t get much simpler. The DUO Light uses an ATmega328 (commonly found on Arduino boards) along with an external SRAM chip to provide a low-level computer programming experience that will suit those new to programming and some more experienced tinkerers. At the time of w...

  • NYC Maker Faire: The Logistics of Manufacturing Pentagons

    NYC Maker Faire: The Logistics of Manufacturing Pentagons

    hackaday.com 20 Sep '14, 8pm

    for Blinkytape, a WS2812 LED strip with an Arduino on one end of the strip to generate patterns of colors. This year, [Matt] is moving into three dimensions with a system of pentagons with a single RGB LED mounted in the center. The pentagons can be soldered together into a regular po...

  • Munich: Help Plan Hackaday’s First European Event

    Munich: Help Plan Hackaday’s First European Event

    hackaday.com 20 Sep '14, 5pm

    The big question we have right now, is what kind of hands-on hardware hacking do you want to do? We published a page over on Hackaday.io to discuss the possibilities. Let your imagination run wild and we’ll do our best to make it all happen. We know from James’ hackerspace tour last y...

  • PSP Lithium Hack Could Be Called the Franken-Cell

    PSP Lithium Hack Could Be Called the Franken-Cell

    hackaday.com 20 Sep '14, 2pm

    The key is protection. The chemistry in Lithium cells of several types brings a working voltage of around 3.7V. Swapping the cells — even if they are different capacities — should work as protection circuits generally measure current, voltage, and sometimes temperature as they charge ...

  • NYC MakerFaire: A Really, Really Big Printer

    hackaday.com 20 Sep '14, 11am

    The printer doesn’t extrude filament. Instead, this printer sucks up PLA pellets and extrudes them with a modified injection mold press mounted to a delta printer frame. That’s a 4mm nozzle squirting plastic. The heater for the extruder is 110 V, and the NEMA32 motors are controlled w...

  • Vector Laser Projector is a Lesson in Design Processes

    Vector Laser Projector is a Lesson in Design Processes

    hackaday.com 20 Sep '14, 8am

    After two years of EE coursework, [Joshua Bateman] and [Adam Catley] were looking for a fun summer project. Instead of limping along with the resources they could put together themselves, they managed to get their school — Bristol University — to foot the bill! Now Uni’s aren’t in the...

  • Auto-Balancing Gimbal Keeps your Coffee from Spilling

    Auto-Balancing Gimbal Keeps your Coffee from Spilling

    hackaday.com 20 Sep '14, 5am

    The gimbal itself is made out of solid steel, welded together for maximum durability. He first built it out of plastic to test the concept, but then quickly moved to the all-metal solution. It’s a 2-axis gimbal featuring very powerful brushless DC motors, capable of balancing even a l...

  • Stepping Through Code on a Pace 4000 Set Top Box

    Stepping Through Code on a Pace 4000 Set Top Box

    hackaday.com 20 Sep '14, 2am

    The image above shows a different piece of hardware. From looking at it we’re pretty sure this is a Bus Blaster which is specifically designed for JTAG debugging with ARM processors. This is the beginning of the second part of his documentation which involves code dumping and stepping...

  • Hacklet 16 – Terrific Telepresence Technology

    Hacklet 16 – Terrific Telepresence Technology

    hackaday.com 19 Sep '14, 11pm

    This weeks Hacklet is all about being there when you can’t through the magic of telepresence. More than just teleconferencing, telepresence takes things a step further to put the user in a remote space. That might be a robot platform, VR goggles, or a actuators to interact with the re...

  • Finally, a Hamster Wheel for the Rest of Us

    Finally, a Hamster Wheel for the Rest of Us

    hackaday.com 19 Sep '14, 8pm

    Numerous studies say standing desks are better for your health, and even more encourage people to walk for longer periods throughout the day. Why not turn your office-desk into a giant hamster-wheel to increase your productivity? Ridiculous? Yes, but you have to admit — it looks prett...

  • Experience the “Farmer’s Market” of Vintage Electronics

    Experience the “Farmer’s Market” of Vintage Electronics

    hackaday.com 19 Sep '14, 5pm

    Normally when you think of a Farmer’s Market, fresh produce grown nearby comes to mind. This experience was similar in that much of the produce was conceived locally, but the goal is to be anything but fresh. I had the opportunity last weekend to attend the final Electronics Flea Mark...

  • Using Facebook Ads to Prank your Friends

    Using Facebook Ads to Prank your Friends

    hackaday.com 19 Sep '14, 2pm

    Most tech savvy individuals are well aware of the vast amounts of data that social networking companies collect on us. Some take steps to avoid this data collection, others consider it a trade-off for using free tools to stay in touch with friends and family. Sometimes these ads can g...

  • THP Semifinalist: Farmbot

    THP Semifinalist: Farmbot

    hackaday.com 19 Sep '14, 11am

    The FarmBot team has been pretty busy with their CNC Farming and Gathering machine . The idea is to automate the farming process with precise deployment of tools: plows, seed injection, watering, sensors, etc. An Arduino with an added RAMPS handles the movement, and a Raspi provides i...

  • Secret Door Is Now Not So Secret

    Secret Door Is Now Not So Secret

    hackaday.com 19 Sep '14, 8am

    You’d be hard pressed to find someone who didn’t think secret doors are cool. They can come in many different forms, a built-in book case, a fake fireplace or even the rudimentary trap door under the rug. [oggfaba] has created a sweet secret door to enter his house. It is so well done...

  • [Sprite_TM] Puts Linux in a Clock Radio

    hackaday.com 19 Sep '14, 5am

    [Sprite] needs an alarm clock to wake up in the morning, and although his phone has an infinitely programmable alarm clock, his ancient Phillips AJ-3040 has never failed him. It’s served him well for 15 years, and there’s no reason to throw it out. Upgrading it was the only way, with ...

  • DIY Magnetic Stirrer Looks Profesional

    DIY Magnetic Stirrer Looks Profesional

    hackaday.com 19 Sep '14, 2am

    . Unlike some DIY stirrers out on the ‘web, this one gets an “A” for aesthetics. It’s clean white lines allow it to look right at home in the professional laboratory. The graduated knob looks good and is functional too as the the potentiometer it is attached to allows multiple mixing ...

  • Building a Vector Monitor Controller

    hackaday.com 18 Sep '14, 8pm

    I used a LCR meter. It ended up being very close to the original atari yokes values so it was good. I think the deflection driver I made would be way overkill for a 5″ B/W yoke. The deflection I made should be cable of driving 27″ TV Yokes. There was a guy that built a deflection driv...

  • 3D Printer Gets Wheels, Leaves Trail Of Plastic Boxes

    3D Printer Gets Wheels, Leaves Trail Of Plastic Boxes

    hackaday.com 18 Sep '14, 5pm

    The limitation of 3D Printer build volume is over. The folks over at NEXT and LIFE Labs have created a prototype robot with a 3D print head attached to it. Unlike a traditional 3D Printer that moves the print head around within the confines of a machine, the 3&DBot drives the print he...

  • Fail of the Week: Robotic 1950 Mercury Boogies, Won’t Come Back From Dead Man’s Curve

    Fail of the Week: Robotic 1950 Mercury Boogies, Won’t Come Back From Dead Man’s Curve

    hackaday.com 18 Sep '14, 2pm

    1) The motor controller didn’t work with the steering motor, but WHY not? I wouldn’t be satisfied until I knew the reason behind it, or at least had a hypothesis. 2) While the “oversteering” issue isn’t clearly described, it sounds like it’s turning sideways into walls. Maybe because ...

  • A DIY MIDI Wind Controller

    A DIY MIDI Wind Controller

    hackaday.com 18 Sep '14, 11am

    Once at the base station, the MIDI data can be output to any number of synths and computers, but [J.M.] added a MIDI codec chip right in the device to play with only a set of headphones. It doesn’t sound great – about the same as an old Sound Blaster card – but with the mod and expres...