hackaday.com Archives - 06 May 2016, Friday

  • Clever And Elegant Tilt Sensors From Ferrofluid

    Clever And Elegant Tilt Sensors From Ferrofluid | Hackaday

    hackaday.com 06 May '16, 5am

    Let’s talk about tilt sensors for a second. The simplest tilt sensors – the dead simplest – are a few ball bearings rolling around in a small metal can. When the can is tilted, the balls roll into a pair of electrical contacts, completing the circuit. How about a drop of mercury in a ...

  • Talk to the Glove | Hackaday

    hackaday.com 06 May '16, 2am

    There is at least one text-to-speech for US sign; but remember that there are different sign languages for each country, and even in some countries there are different dialects (such as “Queensland” style Australian Sign Language and “Victorian” style sign language; although often sim...

  • Don’t Take Photos of Your Arduino 101 Either, Its Light Sensitive: Wafer level c...

    Don’t Take Photos of Your Arduino 101 Either, Its Light Sensitive | Hackaday

    hackaday.com 05 May '16, 11pm

    Wafer level chips are cheap and very tiny, but as [Kevin Darrah] shows, vulnerable to bright light without the protective plastic casings standard on other chip packages. We covered a similar phenomenon when the Raspberry Pi 2 came out. A user was taking photos of his Pi to document a...

  • Amazing Analysis of a 350,000 LED Airport Art Project | Hackaday

    hackaday.com 05 May '16, 8pm

    Before you zip to the comments to scream “not a hack,” watch a few minutes of this teardown video. This 48 minute detailed walkthrough of a one-off art piece shows every aspect of the project: every requirement, design decision, implementation challenge, and mistake. Some notable deta...

  • Which Wireless Tech is Right For You? | Hackaday

    hackaday.com 05 May '16, 5pm

    Knowing your range is important because if you need a range further than a base station, you have to have some kind of mesh network. If your WiFi router only gets you to the back door of your house and you have sensors in your garden, you need a WiFi range extender at the back door, o...

  • Which Wireless Tech is Right For You? | Hackaday

    hackaday.com 05 May '16, 5pm

    Knowing your range is important because if you need a range further than a base station, you have to have some kind of mesh network. If your WiFi router only gets you to the back door of your house and you have sensors in your garden, you need a WiFi range extender at the back door, o...

  • Can you hear SamSat-218D? | Hackaday

    hackaday.com 05 May '16, 3pm

    What happens is numbers are assigned to objects tracked, but they are not sure which cubesat is which object. Only by carefully checking the broadcast signal and Doppler they can identify which object is which transmitter and so assign the correct number to the correct object. In real...

  • Analog to Digital Converter (ADC): A True Understanding | Hackaday

    hackaday.com 05 May '16, 2pm

    Voltage divider: two resistors in series. Easy. The voltage at the node between them will be some fraction of the voltage at the top. An example would be a 1K Ohm resistor on top, and a 300 Ohm resistor on the bottom. This will take an input voltage of 14V at the top and drop it down ...

  • Screw Drive Tractor Is About To Conquer Canada | Hackaday

    hackaday.com 05 May '16, 11am

    Actually, if the screw drive is spinning quickly, it’s more likely to sink into the ground. Wet clays are often thixotropic, thinning in viscosity when subjected to shear forces, which is part of the reason that it’s a bad idea to quickly spin your car’s tires when you’re stuck in the...

  • 35 MPH NERF Darts!

    35 MPH NERF Darts! | Hackaday

    hackaday.com 05 May '16, 8am

    Did you know the muzzle velocity of a NERF dart out of a toy gun? Neither did [MJHanagan] until he did all sorts of measurement . And now we all know: between 35 and 40 miles per hour (around 60 km/h). First, he prototyped a single beam-break detector (shown above) and then expanded h...

  • Reverse Engineer Your Robot Lawnmower | Hackaday

    hackaday.com 05 May '16, 5am

    Your home is your castle, and you are king or queen of all you survey. You’ve built your own home-automation system from scratch. Why would you possibly settle for the stock firmware in your robotic lawnmower? [Daniel Wiegert] wouldn’t either, so in Project Landlord he has started to ...

  • Infrared Detector Selects Over a Wide Range

    Infrared Detector Selects Over a Wide Range | Hackaday

    hackaday.com 05 May '16, 2am

    You can classify infrared light into three broad ranges: short wave, medium wave, and long wave. Traditionally, sensors concentrate on one or two bands, and each band has its own purpose. Short wave IR, for example, produces images similar to visible light images. Long wave is good fo...

  • What’s The Weather Like For The Next Six Hours?: The magic glowing orb that tell...

    What’s The Weather Like For The Next Six Hours? | Hackaday

    hackaday.com 04 May '16, 11pm

    The magic glowing orb that tells the future has been a popular thing to make ever since we realized we had the technology to bring it out of the fortune teller’s tent. We really like [jarek319]’s interpretation of the concept. Sitting mystically above his umbrella stand, with a single...

  • Your Quadcopter Has Three Propellers Too Many

    Your Quadcopter Has Three Propellers Too Many | Hackaday

    hackaday.com 04 May '16, 8pm

    While studying failure modes for quadcopters, and how to get them safely to the ground with less than a full quad of propellers, a group of researchers at the Institute for Dynamic Systems and Control at ETH Zurich came up with a great idea: a mode of flight that’s like the controlled...

  • JIT Learning Using Expert Systems

    JIT Learning Using Expert Systems | Hackaday

    hackaday.com 04 May '16, 6pm

    Chris Gammell is a guy that should need no introduction around these parts. He’s a co-host on The Amp Hour , and the guy behind Contextual Electronics , a fabulous introduction to electronics and one of the best ways to learn KiCad. If you want to talk about the pedagogy of electronic...

  • Getting Ugly, Dead Bugs, and Going to Manhattan | Hackaday

    hackaday.com 04 May '16, 5pm

    Does Ugly work? You bet! One famous example from the ham radio world is the Ugly Weekender. Designed by Roger and Wes Hayward in 1981, the Ugly Weekender is a low-power (QRP) transmitter for the 40-meter band. Started as a father and son project over Christmas break, the Weekender acc...

  • Creating Full Color Images on Thermoformed Parts | Hackaday

    hackaday.com 04 May '16, 4pm

    In a race to produce the cheapest and most efficient full-color 3D object, we think Disney’s Research facility (ETH Zurich and the Interactive Geometry Lab ) may have found the key. Combining hydrographic printing techniques with plastic thermoforming. You might remember our article l...

  • A Rubidium Reference for Discrete Component Clocks

    A Rubidium Reference for Discrete Component Clocks | Hackaday

    hackaday.com 04 May '16, 3pm

    Sometimes you open a freshly created Hackaday.io project and discover more than you expect. A moment of idle curiosity turns into a lengthy read involving several projects you wonder how you managed to miss the first time around. So it was this morning, with [Yann Guidon]’s documentat...

  • Carbon Monoxide: Hunting a Silent Killer

    Carbon Monoxide: Hunting a Silent Killer | Hackaday

    hackaday.com 04 May '16, 2pm

    Standalone wearable carbon monoxide sensors do exist, but they have some caveats. Companies like BW and Sensorcon sell these sensors for firefighters, HVAC techs and other professionals. Priced at $100 and up, the sensors are still relatively expensive. They also require periodic cali...

  • Home Brew Vacuum Tubes Are Easier Than You Think | Hackaday

    hackaday.com 04 May '16, 8am

    [Simplifier]’s workshop seems like a pretty cool place. It must have a bit of an early 20th-century vibe, like the shop that [John Fleming] used for his early work on vacuum tubes. Glass work, metal work, electronics – looks like [Simplifier] has a little bit of everything going on. T...

  • An Open Source Lead Tester | Hackaday

    hackaday.com 04 May '16, 5am

    If you’ve ever needed an example of colossal failure of government actors, you need only to look at Flint, Michigan’s water crisis. After the city of Flint changed water supplies from Detroit to the Flint river, city officials failed to add the correct corrosion inhibitors. This meant...

  • The Dark Arts: Anonymity | Hackaday

    hackaday.com 04 May '16, 3am

    Sorry to be so vague, im actually very interested in these sort of networks (theres moar) and use them some times, but not a whole lot because of all the bad shit they attract. The thing is i dont wanna get some sort of target on my back just for ‘knowing things’ or something. (while ...

  • Soldering Iron Cauterization

    Soldering Iron Cauterization | Hackaday

    hackaday.com 04 May '16, 2am

    Medical hacks are not for the weak of stomach, so read further at your own risk. [Todd Harrison] shows you how to remove a stubborn skin wart using a good ol’ soldering iron, and a fair endurance for pain. After all, cauterization is a well known and documented medical procedure. If y...

  • DNA Extraction With A 3D-Printed Centrifuge

    DNA Extraction With A 3D-Printed Centrifuge | Hackaday

    hackaday.com 03 May '16, 11pm

    [F.Lab] is really worried that we are going to prepare a DNA sample from saliva, dish soap, and rubbing alcohol in their 3D-printed centrifuge and then drink it like a shot. Perhaps they have learned from an horrific experience, perhaps biologists have different dietary requirements. ...

  • Retrotechtacular: TV Troubleshooting | Hackaday

    hackaday.com 03 May '16, 8pm

    As technology advances, finding the culprit in a malfunctioning device has become somewhat more difficult. As an example, troubleshooting an AM radio is pretty straightforward. There are two basic strategies. First, you can inject a signal in until you can hear it. Then you work backw...

  • The Dark Arts: Anonymity | Hackaday

    hackaday.com 03 May '16, 5pm

    Sorry to be so vague, im actually very interested in these sort of networks (theres moar) and use them some times, but not a whole lot because of all the bad shit they attract. The thing is i dont wanna get some sort of target on my back just for ‘knowing things’ or something. (while ...

  • Not Even Hamsters Are Safe From The Internet Of Things

    Not Even Hamsters Are Safe From The Internet Of Things | Hackaday

    hackaday.com 03 May '16, 3pm

    The internet of things is this strange marketing buzzword that seems to escape from the aether and infect our toasters and refrigerators. Now even a hamster is not safe. [Mifulapirus]’s hamster, Ham, was living a pleasant hamster life. Then his owner heard about another hamster named ...

  • Volkswagen Beetle – The Most Hackable Car: If you build a better mousetrap, the ...

    Volkswagen Beetle – The Most Hackable Car | Hackaday

    hackaday.com 03 May '16, 2pm

    Built by Ferdinand Porsche in 1930’s Germany, the Beetle was designed to be a car for anyone and everyone. Its leader at the time wanted a true “people’s car” (i.e. “Volkswagen”) that was affordable for a German family, could reliably travel at sustained highway speeds on the new Germ...

  • I Am Satoshi Nakamoto

    I Am Satoshi Nakamoto | Hackaday

    hackaday.com 03 May '16, 1pm

    OK, you got me. I’m not. Neither is Dorian Nakamoto, pictured above, and neither is this [Craig White] guy. Or at least, his supposed proof that he is “Satoshi” doesn’t stand up to scrutiny . Indeed, you can re-create it yourself and pretend to be “Satoshi” too. If you haven’t been fo...

  • Reverse Engineering An ATM Card Skimmer | Hackaday

    hackaday.com 03 May '16, 11am

    While vacationing in Bali, [Matt South] walked into a nice, secure, air-conditioned cubicle housing an ATM. Knowing card skimmers are the bane of every traveller, [Matt] did the sensible thing and jiggled the card reader and the guard that hides your PIN when punching it into the nume...

    Related:
    1. 2016 railsconf.com 03 May '16, 3pm