hackaday.com Archives - 27 February 2013, Wednesday

  • Acrylic enclosures use integrated clips to do away with fasteners

    hackaday.com 27 Feb '13, 11pm

    Here’s a design that lets you make acrylic enclosures without using fasteners . The red outline in the diagram above is a bit hard to make out. But look closely and you’ll realize that there is very little material which has been removed to form the clip. This uses the rigidity/flexib...

  • Interpreting Brainf*#k on an AVR

    hackaday.com 27 Feb '13, 9pm

    As for why [Dan] would want an AVR to build an interpreter for a language that is nearly unreadable by humans, we honestly have no idea other than the common, ‘because it’s there’ sentiment. There are some pretty cool projects out there that use brainfuck, including this genetic algor...

  • Hacking a radio controlled spy device for overly attached girlfriend.

    Hacking a radio controlled spy device for overly attached girlfriend.

    hackaday.com 27 Feb '13, 5pm

    I ultimately decided I would get a very fast and small radio controlled car to use as a platform, and I would use the guts of the Intruder as the spy portion. This worked very well. Then, I took a trip to one of the nicer hobby stores in town, Hobby Town . I explained my project and t...

  • Making a violin mold with a 3D printer

    Making a violin mold with a 3D printer

    hackaday.com 27 Feb '13, 3pm

    Some people see 3D printers as expensive and slow devices for replicating bracelets, whistles, and Yoda heads. Until the world transitions to a plastic octopus-based economy, those of us with 3D printers will have to find something useful for these tools. Bayesian Empiritheurgy out of...

  • The coolest homebrew computer gets its own case

    The coolest homebrew computer gets its own case

    hackaday.com 27 Feb '13, 1pm

    Thank you for your comments! Well, Kiwi isn’t about building the coolest homebrew computer. Kiwi is about having fun tinkering around and fulfilling a dream I had as a child in the 1980ies (as agtrier said). I hope we have passed the system-war-times. “Amiga is cooler than Atari or vi...

  • NSL takes their propeller driven car to the drive through

    NSL takes their propeller driven car to the drive through

    hackaday.com 27 Feb '13, 11am

    Actually the prop arc is kind of small, so sticking random body parts in it is not what most worries me. What most worries me is that it’s a wooden propeller, which have been known to splinter, and fracture and throw a sharp stake out at high velocity. In it’s intended use on a model ...

  • Mac EFI PIN lock brute force attack (unsuccessful)

    Mac EFI PIN lock brute force attack (unsuccessful)

    hackaday.com 27 Feb '13, 3am

    You can read his back story at the link above. He had the chance to enter a 4-digit pin before the format process. Now that he’s wiped the drive the code is at least 6 characters long, which is a lot more possibilities (at least it’s numeric characters only!). To automate the process ...

  • Simple to build programmable foot switches

    Simple to build programmable foot switches

    hackaday.com 27 Feb '13, 1am

    Your hands do a lot of work between the keyboard and the mouse, why the heck are you letting your feet be so lazy? [Dossier van D.] is putting an end to the podiatric sloth. He built this set of three foot pedals which have gone through two versions of functionality. The buttons thems...

  • Smashed tablet in NES case lives out its days as an emulator

    Smashed tablet in NES case lives out its days as an emulator

    hackaday.com 26 Feb '13, 11pm

    The creator of this project started off with a 7″ tablet he received from a coworker. The screen was horribly smashed from one corner spreading out through the entire surface. But the hardware inside still worked, including the HDMI out port. He ended up transplanting the tablet hardw...

  • Python frontend is a GUI for different microcontrollers

    Python frontend is a GUI for different microcontrollers

    hackaday.com 26 Feb '13, 9pm

    [Navin] has been hard at work producing a GUI which works with different micocontrollers . The idea is to make it even easier to develop projects by simplifying the feedback and control you can get from the prototyping hardware. The best part about it is that he designed the software ...

  • A respectable electronics bench that’s not a pain to move

    A respectable electronics bench that’s not a pain to move

    hackaday.com 26 Feb '13, 7pm

    Apartment dwellers who are living the nomadic lifestyle take note. You don’t need to live your tinkering lifestyle out of a toolbox. Here is a great example of a respectable electronics bench which breaks down when it’s time to move (translated ). We’re sure you already belong to your...

  • Massively parallel CPU processes 256 shades of gray

    Massively parallel CPU processes 256 shades of gray

    hackaday.com 26 Feb '13, 5pm

    The 1980s were a heyday for strange computer architectures; instead of the von Newmann architecture you’d find in one of today’s desktop computers or the Harvard architecture of a microcontroller, a lot of companies experimented with strange parallel designs. While not used much today...

  • Taking the pain out of making custom Eagle parts

    Taking the pain out of making custom Eagle parts

    hackaday.com 26 Feb '13, 3pm

    One thing that’s really convenient for custom Eagle parts is that most components are DIPs or some sort of leaded SMD component. [Dave]‘s script takes the dimensional data from any chip’s datasheet and creates a custom outline for each part. The inputs and outputs can also be ripped d...

  • Giving 3D printed parts a shiny smooth finish

    Giving 3D printed parts a shiny smooth finish

    hackaday.com 26 Feb '13, 1pm

    Beware that smoothing 3D printed parts with a solvent is PATENTED, just like many other OBVIOUS little things you can do while making 3D printed parts also have been granted ridiculous patents. Some obvious examples are: 1) Keeping your 3D printer at a warm temperature in a temperatur...

  • Hacking the International Space Station with a toothbrush

    Hacking the International Space Station with a toothbrush

    hackaday.com 26 Feb '13, 11am

    [Douglas Adams] will tell you not to forget your towel when it comes to space travel. But NASA may start mandating that astronauts always carry a toothbrush. That’s because when a recent repair on a critical International Space Station component went wrong it was a toothbrush hack tha...

  • Automatic beer pourer was hacked together from a bit of everything

    Automatic beer pourer was hacked together from a bit of everything

    hackaday.com 26 Feb '13, 3am

    Many of the parts come from a washing machine that the team scrapped for the build — most notably the motor which drives the belt. But pretty much every part of it is salvaged. For instance, the conveyor belt that transports the full glasses was made from gluing sections of bicycle in...

  • Laser Kaleidoscope uses more 3D printing and less scavenging

    Laser Kaleidoscope uses more 3D printing and less scavenging

    hackaday.com 26 Feb '13, 1am

    At first we thought that [Pete Prodoehl] was using the wrong term when calling his project a Laser Kaleidoscope . We usually think of a kaleidoscope as a long tube with three mirrors and some beads or glass shards in one end. But we looked it up and there’s a second definition that me...

  • Critter cam hacked from an old cellphone.

    Critter cam hacked from an old cellphone.

    hackaday.com 25 Feb '13, 11pm

    [Art Barrios] kept having night-time visitors who were raiding his dog’s food storage bin. It’s a plastic tub with a lid that latches but the critters were knocking it over and popping that lid off. He wanted to find out which animal was the culprit so he hacked together an automatic ...

  • Using a flashing LCD monitor to transfer data

    Using a flashing LCD monitor to transfer data

    hackaday.com 25 Feb '13, 7pm

    We love the concept of using an LCD screen to transfer data. The most wide-spread and successful method we know of is the combination of a QR code and the camera on a smart phone. But for less powerful/costly devices data can be transferred simply by flashing colors on the screen. Tha...

  • Ubuntu with a GUI on a Beagleboard

    hackaday.com 25 Feb '13, 5pm

    The Raspberry Pi is great if you’re looking for a cheap yet powerful computer running Linux, but let’s not forget all the other ARM dev boards out there. [Adam] spent some time this weekend putting together an Ubuntu distro for his Beagleboard XM to give it the convenience of a GUI an...

  • Modifying a printer for PCB fabbing

    Modifying a printer for PCB fabbing

    hackaday.com 25 Feb '13, 1pm

    The migraine-inducing image above is the product of [Rupert Hirst]‘s attempts at home PCB fabrication. He’s using the toner transfer method – printing a circuit on a piece of transparency sheet with a laser printer, setting it on a piece of copper clad board, and sending the whole ass...

  • Building huge displays with LED strips

    Building huge displays with LED strips

    hackaday.com 25 Feb '13, 11am

    Building RGB LED displays is one of the most interesting programming and engineering challenges we see here on Hackaday. Not only do the creators of large displays and LED cubes have to deal with the power requirements of driving a whole bunch of LEDs, but there’s also the issue of ge...

  • Arduinofied QRP radio beacon

    hackaday.com 24 Feb '13, 7pm

    A while back, [m0xpd] picked up an unbearably cheap AD9850 DDS module from ebay. He turned this in to a Raspberry Pi-powered radio beacon, but like so many builds that grace our pages, the trolls didn’t like using such an overpowered computer for such a simple device. To keep those tr...

  • A remote-controlled, autonomous kite generates power

    hackaday.com 24 Feb '13, 5pm

    Autonomous: “not subject to control from outside; independent.” Remote Control: “control of a system or activity by a person at a different place” Please don’t write “remote-controlled, autonomous” as a description for anything. They pretty much mean opposite things! This is one of my...

  • Reading Sensors with Scratch

    Reading Sensors with Scratch

    hackaday.com 24 Feb '13, 3pm

    Scratch, a graphical programming language developed by MIT’s Media Lab, is an excellent tool for teaching programming. [Daniel] created an Arduino Sensor Shield to interface with Scratch, allowing for real-world input to the language. This board is a derivative of the Picoboard , whic...

  • Multibooting the Raspberry Pi

    Multibooting the Raspberry Pi

    hackaday.com 24 Feb '13, 1pm

    Those of us have been dual booting Linux, Windows, and OS X operating systems for a while will be familiar with bootloaders such as GRUB and its ilk. Surprisingly, though, we haven’t seen a bootloader for the most popular computer of the last year – the Raspberry Pi. It makes sense to...

  • Automated pH Control

    hackaday.com 23 Feb '13, 7pm

    Controlling the pH level of a solution is usually a tedious task. Adding an acid or base to the solution will change the pH, but manually monitoring the levels and adding the correct amount isn’t fun. [Reza] rigged up an automated pH controller to keep a solution’s pH steady. The buil...

  • gaming

    Hack a Day — Fresh hacks every day

    hackaday.com 23 Feb '13, 6pm

    [Matt Galisa] decided to try his hand at setting up the Belkin WeMo outlet without using a Smartphone app . The hardware is a pass-through for mains voltage which allows you to switch the plug over the network. It has a built-in WiFi module which normally connects to your home network...

  • Tickle-Me-Elmo… Frozen In Carbonite

    hackaday.com 23 Feb '13, 5pm

    We at [HAD] love any hack that combines children’s toys with science-fiction technology, so seeing a Tickle-Me-Elmo “frozen” in [Carbonite] is a definite win in our book. It’s also a great argument for joining your local Hackerspace, or just getting together with some like-minded frie...

  • An industrial RepRap

    hackaday.com 23 Feb '13, 3pm

    It may just be another 3D printer, but [Jonas] and [Simon]‘s Kühling & Kühling RepRap Industrial is a cross between a work of art and a beautiful machine tool. It also looks to be a pretty nice 3D printer, to boot. The Kühling RepRap is built out of 20mm t-slot aluminum with plastic s...