hackaday.com Archives - 12 April 2013, Friday

  • Generating electricity from alcohol

    Generating electricity from alcohol

    hackaday.com 12 Apr '13, 9pm

    The build is passively cooled, using a sync assembly that takes advantage of heat pipes to help increase the heat dissipation. A nearly flat heat sink makes up the mounting surface for the hot side, which faces down toward a flame driving the generator. [x2Jiggy] started the project b...

  • New post: Horribly complicated electric guitar keyboard

    Horribly complicated electric guitar keyboard

    hackaday.com 12 Apr '13, 7pm

    So let’s dig into the house of cards he built for the project. It starts off with the guitar which has been fitted with an additional pickup to interface with a Roland GR-33 synthesizer pedal. That outputs a MIDI signal, which many hackers would have connected to the computer and pars...

  • Build your own air-powered Star Trek "whoosh" doors

    Star Trek inspired pocket doors

    hackaday.com 12 Apr '13, 5pm

    I noticed people talking about the safety of getting caught between the doors but what about that fact that he cut out the header over the door,the 2 header support studs, and the 2 full run studs along the header supports. One way or another, be it directly or indirectly, that is a l...

  • Jeep Wrangler gets pressurized water right out of the bumper

    Jeep Wrangler gets pressurized water right out of the bumper

    hackaday.com 12 Apr '13, 1pm

    If you want running water you’ve got to have a place to put it. This is actually what sparked the idea for the project. [Ed] noticed that the bumper was hollow and had some drain holes on the bottom. After plugging those and adding a fill hole to the top he found that he had a reservo...

  • Hacking the Oculus Rift: the Oculight

    hackaday.com 11 Apr '13, 9pm

    Our Oculus Rift finally arrived in the mail. I’ll spare you my thoughts on the item itself other than to say it is amazing. There are tons of videos to choose from that show people’s thoughts and reactions, and Ifixit has their usual detailed teardown as well. The mod I decided to tac...

  • Automating a mechanical typewriter

    Automating a mechanical typewriter

    hackaday.com 11 Apr '13, 9pm

    It would have been much easier to patch into an electric typewriter, but we have seen the string trick used on those as well . In this case a loop of string attaches to the the bar under each key, allowing a pull from below to type the character. An automotive door lock actuator ([Har...

  • Top 10 best hacking scenes in movies

    hackaday.com 11 Apr '13, 8pm

    Geeking out and complaining about inaccuracies is fun. But it is like junk food. Too much is bad for your health. We’ve done the Top 10 worst portrayals of hacking in movies /TV as well as a Part 2 due to high demand. Now it is time for the good stuff. Take it in and feel those health...

  • Guitar EQ levels trigger the stage lights

    Guitar EQ levels trigger the stage lights

    hackaday.com 11 Apr '13, 7pm

    the hack that adds an EQ display for a pedal board he got the idea to convert the concept as control hardware instead of just for feedback. Just like the visualization project he uses an MSGEQ7 chip which takes care of the audio analysis. He’s using this for electric guitar so he only...

  • A motorized snowboard: Because, you know, it's not like there's gravity or anything to move you along

    Snowboard propulsion system motors you through the flats

    hackaday.com 11 Apr '13, 2pm

    One advantage that skiers have always had over snowboarders is the ability to move through flat sections with ease. [Matt Gardner] built this prototype to help even the playing field. When he would normally need to kick, hop, or remove the board and walk he can now engage his snowboar...

  • Perpetual pong

    Perpetual pong

    hackaday.com 10 Apr '13, 9pm

    The brain of the device is a PIC 16F684 which drives the six rows of the display directly. He went with a decade counter (CD74HC401) to scan the rows one at a time. Now what would you expect to find on the underside of this hunk of protoboard? A rat’s nest of point to point wiring? If...

  • MIDI pedal project looks as good as it sounds

    MIDI pedal project looks as good as it sounds

    hackaday.com 10 Apr '13, 7pm

    An Arduino Nano pulls this project together. It scans the pedals constantly and converts the key presses into MIDI signals. But the design includes this fabulous looking front-end which [Lee] first prototyped in cardboard before cutting and bending his own Aluminum tread plate. A two-...

  • Hacker sends this through the mail to record a video of the process

    Hacker sends this through the mail to record a video of the process

    hackaday.com 10 Apr '13, 1pm

    Camera, digital storage, and battery technology have gotten to the point that it’s both cheap and easy to do this sort of surveillance. But there are a few logistical things that [Ruben] took into account to make this work quite well. First off, he need to hide the camera in a way tha...

  • Wall wart computer mouse

    Wall wart computer mouse

    hackaday.com 09 Apr '13, 9pm

    This rather bulky looking wall wart is actually a computer mouse . Sure, it may cause your hand to cramp horribly if used for any length of time. But some would say it’s worth that for the hipster value of the thing. The rather odd shape is somewhat explained by the fact that this was...

  • Recurve bow make from wood and skis

    Recurve bow make from wood and skis

    hackaday.com 09 Apr '13, 5pm

    He settled on the idea after seeing a few other projects like it on Reddit. After first drawing up a plan he headed down to the shop to cut out the wooden riser (the middle part of a bow). Unlike traditional recurve bows this is made up of three parts. Traditionally you would laminate...

  • The RedBull creation contest begins!

    hackaday.com 09 Apr '13, 4pm

    Basically, it is kind of an LED lighting multi-tool with some extra sensors and output devices on-board. The board is controlled over I2C using an Arduino Uno R3, or you can air-wire pretty much any device that supports 400KHz (fast mode) I2C to the breakout pads. We’ve tested it with...

  • New post: Synthesizing graphene in your basement laboratory

    Synthesizing graphene in your basement laboratory

    hackaday.com 09 Apr '13, 1pm

    We’re surprised that we haven’t come across any of [Robert Murray-Smith's] projects before. Looking through his collection of YouTube uploads proves that he’s a very active amateur chemist (we assume this is a hobby because he performs the experiment in a mayonnaise jar). The video we...

  • Yamaha SW60XG hack lets you use it as a standalone MIDI device

    Yamaha SW60XG hack lets you use it as a standalone MIDI device

    hackaday.com 08 Apr '13, 9pm

    [Benji Kimba] posted the video overview of his project which you can watch after the break. The image above is found at about 2:35 seconds and about twenty seconds later you get a look at how he patched into the conductors on the edge connector on both sides followed by the MIDI in an...

  • Combo lock uses relays and logic gates

    Combo lock uses relays and logic gates

    hackaday.com 08 Apr '13, 5pm

    Here’s a really fascinating circuit that implements a combination lock using relays and logic gates . Even with the schematic and written explanation of how it works we’re still left somewhat in the dark. We’ll either pull out some paper and do it by hand this weekend, or build it chu...

  • Another way to look at Charlieplexing

    Another way to look at Charlieplexing

    hackaday.com 08 Apr '13, 1pm

    Charlieplexing is a technique that allows you to drive a larger number of LEDs than wouldn’t be possible with the same number of I/O pins on a traditional multiplexed matrix. If we lost you there just think of it as lots of blinky lights connected to a small number of pins. It works b...

  • Hackaday Links: Sunday, April 7th, 2013

    hackaday.com 07 Apr '13, 9pm

    Let’s wind down the weekend with some projects that didn’t quite warrant their own feature, but we think they’re still worth a look. First up is a quick tip on cracking the lids on those hard to open jars of food. [Jason] says just grab about a foot of duct tape and the lid will come ...

  • Solar powered robot mows your lawn while you chill indoors

    Solar powered robot mows your lawn while you chill indoors

    hackaday.com 07 Apr '13, 5pm

    We’ve heard quite a number of radio ads lately trying to sell an automatic lawn mowing robot (like a Roomba for your grass). But wouldn’t it be a lot more fun to hack your own from an existing lawnmower? That’s what [Daniel Epperson] did. In fact, the project has been ongoing for year...

  • Acoustic bass guitar uses water jug and two strings

    Acoustic bass guitar uses water jug and two strings

    hackaday.com 07 Apr '13, 1pm

    He posted the demonstration way back in 2009. It wasn’t until a year later that he filmed the particulars of how the thing was made . The strings are actually bass guitar strings, an A and D string that are tuned down to E and A to play along with Black Sabbath’s “Ironman”. The neck i...

  • Making PLA stick to a 3D printer build platform by using hairspray or an acetone ABS slurry

    Making PLA stick to a 3D printer build platform by using hairspray or an acetone ABS slurry

    hackaday.com 06 Apr '13, 9pm

    [Chris] has been having some real problems getting PLA to stick to the build platform of his Printrbot. This is of course not limited to this brand of printers, and affects all extruder-based hardware using the PLA as a source material. He came up with a couple of ways to fix the prob...

  • Rolling your own minimal USB to serial Arduino programmer

    Rolling your own minimal USB to serial Arduino programmer

    hackaday.com 06 Apr '13, 5pm

    [Hans Peter] wanted to move away from using full Arduino boards in his projects. One of the components he rarely used after the development stage is the USB hardware. Once the firmware is flashed to the chip he didn’t need it any longer. So he tried his hand with some really small SMD...

  • New post: Fixing the worst video game ever: E.T. for Atari 2600

    Fixing the worst video game ever: E.T. for Atari 2600

    hackaday.com 06 Apr '13, 1pm

    This is quite a feat in many ways. First off, you need to know the game well enough to understand where they problems lie. The Internet is a huge help in that regard as there’s no shortage of sources complaining about the game’s shortcomings. This turns out to be one of the articles s...

  • Light Graffiti with Servos and Python

    Light Graffiti with Servos and Python

    hackaday.com 05 Apr '13, 7pm

    Light Graffiti is can be lots of fun if you have a decent amount of artistic ability, and a keen sense of timing. If you don’t have the necessary skills, you can always compensate by using Python-controlled servos to move everything automatically . The Python code can be found here, a...

  • Stapler hack fastens infinitely large sheets of paper

    Stapler hack fastens infinitely large sheets of paper

    hackaday.com 05 Apr '13, 5pm

    It’s not called the infinity stapler, but we think it should be. This magnetic hack allows you to use a plain old stapler to fasten very large pieces of paper . The limiting factor has always been the distance between the stapler’s hinge and where the staples come out. To get around t...

  • H-bot style 3D printer moves bed for Z-axis

    H-bot style 3D printer moves bed for Z-axis

    hackaday.com 05 Apr '13, 3pm

    Check out this 3D printer (translated ) which [Arkadiusz Śpiewak] has been working on. When sending in the tip about his project he made the important distinction that it isn’t finished, but he has reached that critical threshold where he has printed items with it. He decided to go wi...

  • Electric tricycle build log is like hacker crack

    Electric tricycle build log is like hacker crack

    hackaday.com 05 Apr '13, 1pm

    Looking through the presentation post linked above is fun, but when we started digging though the six build log posts we felt ourselves getting sucked into the project. It’s a delight every step of the way. It started with an aluminum box which will host the two rear wheels, drive tra...

  • Snowboard goggle HUD displays critical data while falling down a mountain

    Snowboard goggle HUD displays critical data while falling down a mountain

    hackaday.com 05 Apr '13, 11am

    Er, you can’t really call it a Heads Up Display if it causes you to actually look away like this does, even if it is mounted on your head. I suppose it could be said I’m being picky, but the point of HUD’s is to project the information directly in your desired line of sight (ie, looki...